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Raymond S. Wise escribió :...

However, the word "chameau" is traditionally used in French translations ... a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God."

No, it was not a camel nor a dromedary. There was a mistake by St. Hyeronimus

A valiant effort, but he's called "St. Jerome" in English. The only Hieronymus I know of is Bosch.
in his translation of the Gospels from Greek to Latin. The Greek word used was "kamilos" (thick rope), but it ... to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God."

Jerry Friedman
I know only a sprinkling of German, but I've been ... some other, simpler word that meant that phrase, of course.)

Now that you put it this way it appears a bit surprising that it wouldn't be rain coat factory.

Well, we do* make *some compounds, you know. Given enough time.
I'll tell you what's odd, though, is that there are ... don't see any need to tie together phrases like "never-to-be-forgotten."

You can use both 'de onvergetelijke film' and 'een film om nooit te vergeten'. The 'nooit te vergeten film' would be correct, but cumbersome and unusual. You could suspect a speaker using the phrase of not being native.

Right. My fault for trying to mimic something close to what I meant when I couldn't think of a real example. I wasn't sure if "never-to-be-forgotten" was one of the actual cases I'd seen, but it conveyed the sense I wanted: a short phrase used as a modifier, usually in the opening of a sentence.
I don't suppose you can think of a real Dutch example of that sort of thing? Sorry I can't.

Best Donna Richoux
An American living in the Netherlands
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Anyway, French doesn't even have words for toe or potato.

"Toe" is "orteil". You may be thinking of Spanish, which I think has "dedo de pie".

As I learned it, French uses "doigt de pied" and "pomme de terre".

Like Andre, I've also heard "patate" for "sweet potato" from French-Canadians.

Tom Breton at panix.com, username tehom. http://www.panix.com/~tehom
What's that, Canadian or something?

I don't think so. They both are in my small, and not very good, Cuyas French-Spanish dictionary. What dictionary are you using? I ask in order to know which dictionary not to buy.

My Oxford Hachette Concise has 'orteil' but 'potato' is still earth apple - 'patate' is translated as 'spud'

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
there is no such thing as a longest word in Dutch. Words can in principle have infinite (1) length. (1) Infinite in the mathematical sense: given a number of letters you can invent a word that is longer.

That's not "'infinite' in the mathematical sense". A mathematician would say "there's no upper bound on the length of Dutch words" or "Dutch words can be of arbitrarily long length" (different from "of arbitrary length" which implies also that they can be of one letter).

Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
On 13 Jan 2004 11:14:04 -0800, R H Draney (Email Removed) wrote, in part:
tradition has it that Moses himself took down the words of the Pentateuch, which leads to questions about the last few verses of Deuteronomy describing the circumstances of his death..

... which are dealt with nicely in the Talmud.
Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
On 13 Jan 2004 16:11:42 GMT, Louisa Hennessy (Email Removed) wrote, in part:
Can someone tell me what "go figure" means?

"It's an oddity." (I.e., "Go see if you can figure out why.")

Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
On 13 Jan 2004, Jim Ward wrote

In French, paper clips and trombones are both "trombones". Go figure.

I guess Steve Martin was wrong: the French don't have a different word for everything.

But the English do have different words for every animal that is eatable. "Pig"/"pork", "calf"/"veal". Apparently, as soon as you eat it it has to be called something different. ;-) for the unweary.
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131 home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
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Anyway, French doesn't even have words for toe or potato.

Orteil; patate.

Rob Bannister
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