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He watched rather ___ his homework. (A) do (B) did (C) doing

Which is the correct choice?

Thanks very much for your help.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
But instead of doing his homework, he just stares blankly at [all these things / what is before him]. Emotion: smile

"watch" doesn't seem to be the right verb. Curious.
CalifJimBut instead of doing his homework, he just stares blankly at [all these things / what is before him]. Emotion: smile

"watch" doesn't seem to be the right verb. Curious.

Maybe this is because we 'watch' something that is happening or might happen.
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Wouldn't "blankly stare" be an adult interpretation? Emotion: smile
Rather than has two meanings.

1. more readily than, in preference to

They obeyed the order rather than suffer torture or death. Fronting is permitted.

Rather than suffer torture or death they obeyed the order.

2. and not

She telephoned rather than wrote. Fronting is not permitted.

In the end he survives rather than conquers. Fronting is not permitted.

Rather than can also be used as a preposition (= instead of)

Their actions precipated the war rather than averting it.



Hi Pieanne,

With regard to your query and example, I'd probably say '... he just sits and looks at ....'

Sorry, we seem to be a bit off the original topic.

Clive
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According to A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, the subordinator rather than is followed by a bare infinitive clause when the matrix clause expresses the subject's preference. For example,

He paid the fine rather than appeal to a higher court.

Rather than is generally best treated as a quasi-coordinator when it is used with matching forms in the clauses. For example,

They were screaming rather than singing.

She telephoned rather than wrote.

Rather than is a preposition, not a quasi-coordinator, when it is followed by an -ing participle clause that does not match the verb in the matrix clause. For example,

Their actions precipitated the war rather than averting it.



1. Subordinator (Fronting is permitted): followed by a bare infinitive clause

They obeyed the order rather than suffer torture or death.

Rather than suffer torture or death they obeyed the order.

He paid the fine rather than appeal to a higher court.

Rather than Robert drive in his present state, I'd prefer to drive him home myself.

2. Preposition (Fronting is permitted)

Their actions precipated the war rather than averting it.


I decided to write rather than phoning.

Rather than using the last of my cash, I decided to write a cheque.

3. Quasi-coordinator (Fronting is not permitted): used in parallel structures.

She telephoned rather than wrote.

In the end he survives rather than conquers.
Teo, those are some good points, but, by the context of your original example, we are dealing with a question of preference, in which case, rather than is a subordinator and it's positioning makes no odds when making comparisons.
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Jussive
Teo, those are some good points, but, by the context of your original example, we are dealing with a question of preference, in which case, rather than is a subordinator and it's positioning makes no odds when making comparisons.

The original example was taken out of context, so we are not necessarily dealing with a question of preference.

When rather than is used as a subordinator, it has a comparative meaning: approximately "more readily, in preference to." When it is used as a preposition or a coordinator, this meaning is largely or wholly lost.

For more information, please consult The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language.
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