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He watched rather ___ his homework. (A) do (B) did (C) doing

Which is the correct choice?

Thanks very much for your help.
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Hi,

He watched rather ___ his homework. (A) do (B) did (C) doing

Which is the correct choice? None are correct.

Did you forget to type 'than' after 'rather'? That would let C be the right answer.

Best wishes, Clive
Sorry. I made several typos.

He watched TV rather than ___ his homework. (A) did (B) do (C) doing
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I think the answer book is going to say (B), which I agree with.
Normally the form "doing" goes with another "-ing" form, as in "He was watching TV rather than doing his homework".
Nevertheless, (C) seems pretty harmless.
Clive, Do you want to jump back in here and comment?

CJ
Hi,

Well, I wuz gonna say C without any question. However, when I think about it, I wouldn't say that B is wrong, but to me it sounds very odd. I'd be surprised to hear someone say it.

I think what makes it odd is the order of the sentence. If you change it to Rather than do his homework, he watched TV it sounds fine. 'Doing' also sounds fine to me with this order.

Clive
I think the correct answer is did because 'rather than' is usually used in 'parallel structures.'

For example,

In the end he survives rather than conquers. (Finite forms)

I believe it is important to invest in new machinery rather than (to) increase wages. (Infinitives)

I would go with you rather than stay home. (Base forms)

I always prefer starting early, rather than leaving everything to the last minute. (-ing forms)

The dilemma has deepened rather than been resolved. (Past-participials)

We ought to invest in new machinery rather than buildings. (Nouns)

It ought to be you rather than me that signs the letter. (Pronouns)

Wisdom and folly are moral rather than intellectual categories. (Adjectives)

I'd prefer to go in August rather than in July. (Prepositional phrases)
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According to Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (page 474, Third Edition, 2005):

When the main clause has a to-inifitive, rather than is usually followed by an infinitive without to or an -ing form. For example,

I decided to write rather than phone/phoning.

Rather than use/using the last of my cash, I decided to write a cheque.
Teo
I think the correct answer is did because 'rather than' is usually used in 'parallel structures.'

Look at the sentence transposed:

'Rather than did his homework, he just watched.'



What would you use in the following:

'Rather than actually got up and did something, he just watched.'

'Rather than actually getting up and doing something, he just watched.'





I agree with the 'ing' form ('C').

Out of curiosity, how would you express the following situation (which I'm sometimes confronted with, alas...): A child has his (yes, it's "his" in my case) homework to do. All the books, copy-books and pencils are nicely spread out in front of him. But instead of actually doing his homework, he prefers to watch it/all these things.
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