+0
Hi

Below are some sentences from a certain chapter in a book:

Asphalt cut the country like a scar, a long, hot burn of razor-black. Heat had not yet twisted the air, but the driver knew it was coming, the scorching glare, the shimmer at the far place where blue hammered down. He adjusted his sunglasses and threw a glance at the big mirror above the windshield. It showed him the length of the bus and every passenger on it. In thirty years he’d watched all kinds of people in that mirror: the pretty girls and the broken men, the drunks and the crazies, the heavy-breasted women with red, wrinkled babies. The driver could spot trouble a mile away; he could tell who was fine and who was running.

The driver looked at the boy.

The boy looked like a runner.

--- OK, I understand that the asphalt was running through the country and it resembled a scar, however I'm not sure I understand what follows. Does "long" refer to the asphalt or maybe to the scar and what does "razor-black" mean?

--- "Who was fine and who was running" - what does the author mean by "running"?

The boy looked like a runner - Does by "runner" the author probably means a smuggler/gun runner?

cheers
+0
razor-black = a long, sharp, black cut through the countryside, as if cut by a razor.
running = trying to escape from their past.
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi

So, the driver could see who was OK, and who was trying to escape from his/her past?

And the boy looked like the one who was escaping from his past, like someone who was trying to forget about something that happened, right?

By the way, is it typical to call someone who is trying to escape from his/her past a runner, or is it only so in this case. I couldn't find this definition in a dictionary.

Thanks
So, the driver could see who was OK, and who was trying to escape from his/her past?
And the boy looked like the one who was escaping from his past, like someone who was trying to forget about something that happened, right?-- Yes, that's how I read it.

By the way, is it typical to call someone who is trying to escape from his/her past a runner, or is it only so in this case. I couldn't find this definition in a dictionary.-- Not typical. I think it is an ad hoc coinage.
OK, thanks a lot MM!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?