Hi there,

I was wondering if reading books can improve ones speaking skills, a few years back I found it quite easy to get done with a book of the likes of any one of the lord of the rings within a weeks worth of time. However now that I have started looking out for the way sentences are structured, reading seems more like a chore and I can't motivate myself enough to keep reading.

I have a habit of not breaking down sentences/elongating them by not using as little words as possible, it seems like an endless maze that I am trapped in. I have no idea how to get rid of that habit...

I am not really sure what I am trying to ask her so lets just focus on my initial question, does reading help one with their speaking skills at all?

Thanks.
1 2
That's an interesting question, and I suppose a lot of research has been done on it.
"Speaking" can mean a lot of things - delivering a poem aloud from memory; delivering an address from memory or from notes, speaking casually with good friends, answering questions in class, discussing things at a club meeting with intelligent well-spoken people, conversing at a party with intelligent well-spoken people.

Thinking and speaking at the same time can be a daunting task. I doubt that any amount of reading can fully prepare you for it, except that it may put some good ideas in your head and give you something to talk about. When you're required to reply to an unexpected question, the problem of formulating your answer may be separate from the problem of formulating your sentences. In developing these skills, I don't think any amount of reading would be as valuable as an equal amount of good (thoughtful and enjoyable) conversation. Hopefully,you won't have to choose between a stupid, well-spoken answer, and a brilliant, poorly spoken answer.

If you don't have any opportunities for good conversation, then of course you must turn to the media. At least you'll be able to choose your level (hopefully!).

In learning to speak, I think listening is more important than reading. Of course, conversation is best, but if you only get to repeat the same small-talk with uneducated people, learning will be a slow process.

You've already had the bad experience of letting a focus on the details spoil your enjoyment of reading. Don't let it make you tongue-tied as well. Try to find people you like to talk with. They can keep the conversation moving when you get bogged down.

It would be a sad and lonely life if you had to read all the good books before you learned to converse. If you take a month off to read War And Peace, at the end of that month, you probably won't be a better speaker. Better to see the movie. (I didn't say that! )

P.S. See if you can rephrase this so it makes sense: I have a habit of not breaking down sentences/elongating them by not using as little words as possible, it seems like an endless maze that I am trapped in. I have no idea how to get rid of that habit...
I have been speaking in English for about a year or so with native speakers, thinking and speaking at the same isn't much of a problem anymore for me, it comes kinda naturally. But I still at times end up jumbling my sentences and making a mess out of them. I guess its just frustrating that after such a long time I am still making the most elemental mistakes...

I have a habit of not breaking down sentences/elongating them by not using as little words as possible, it seems like an endless maze that I am trapped in. I have no idea how to get rid of that habit...

I guess I could reword that part. At times my sentences are not really coherently divided, I use a lot of conjunctions to stitch multiple ideas together which I guess confuses people in the end.


Haha I am not sure if that made any sense either.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I had misunderstood your (blue) sentence completely.

It seems like for only a year's experience you're pretty well on track. Hopefully, you can converse on a daily basis.

In your written work, are you able to construct sentences in a way that satisfies you?
I have been writing essays and the sort ever since primary school. However I didn't grow up in an environment where people really spoke English, I would converse in my native tongue most of the time.. but that was all until a year or so ago.

My writing skills are pretty good, at least I would like to think so. Especially if I give it a lot of thought and recheck my sentences to make sure I haven't made any errors in formulating my ideas on the paper.

Especially if I give it a lot of thought and recheck my sentences to make sure I haven't made any errors in formulating my ideas on the paper.

That sentence doesn't look quite right Emotion: stick out tongue, could you reword it for me please?

EDIT:

PS have you ever noticed a non native speaker drag a sentence on and on without any apparent reason? I tend to do that, I use too many words to get my ideas across at times. I guess with time I will manage to loose that habit but it is kinda annoying to make a mistake you know about.
S.P.I. Especially if I give it a lot of thought and recheck my sentences to make sure I haven't made any errors in formulating my ideas on the paper.
Can you explain exactly what it is that bothers you about this phrase?

Learners often compose sentences which are two or three lines in length, have multiple clauses of multiple types, and are seriously ambiguous. I urge them to break these into shorter sentences, which seems to be a concern you've described earlier.

Your thoughts are clear and easy to follow, and are expressed in simple logical phrases.

But your punctuation suggests that this is a "stream of consciousness."

Many native speakers converse casually in this way. Surely we can't be expected to have a sentence fully formed in our minds before we begin to speak.

This is what I was getting at when I asked if you were satisfied with your written composition, or if it too has this run-on quality which you find offensive.

So are you saying you keep talking when you should shut up and listen, or are you unhappy with the way you organize your phrasing?

When my kids were little, they used to say they didn't like to ask me about things, because I went on and on. I guess I still do.

I was a music comp major in college. The hardest thing to learn is how to throw something away when it doesn't fit.

<< I use too many words to get my ideas across at times.>> Don't feel like the Lone Ranger. This is a lifelong struggle.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I guess it's a bit of both, at times I find it kinda hard to form logically organized sentences. This usually happens when I am speaking too fast, I gotta take a deep breath more often than not in those circumstances and start all over again. But I have noticed that I am getting better every day, I don't seem to be making those mistakes as often as I used to a few years back.

As for my rambling on problem, I must say that I am glad I am not the only one who does that! haha! Emotion: smile

What you said earlier on about reading books was spot on. I have noticed how books and other literary items can enlighten one, but there is absolutely no substitute for speaking. Listening helps but the best way to perfect ones speaking skills is, I guess, to keep talking with (preferably) native speakers.

It has been fun talking to you, I appreciate the guidance you have offered.
we can listen audio books with this website. classical books are reading for blind people but we can use too.

http://freeclassicaudiobooks.com /
learning a language and especially english is very important and can be practised by speaking and reading so much books and the fan of learning another language,it is so important to learn a good language and to know other cultures,it is so fantastic.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more