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The Farallon Islands, or Devil’s Teeth, as they are referred to by sailors, are a group of small islands with rocky, barren terrain and treacherous underwater currents, 48 km (30 miles) off the coast of San Francisco, California. Although the islands are small, with a combined total land area of 0.41 km squared (0.16 square miles), they are positioned in a major ocean current, which enables them to house dense populations of birds, rodents, seals, and other water mammals.

The abundance of wildlife first attracted Russian and American fur traders in the early 1800s, who then nearly eliminated the seal population in the area. The islands then became an agricultural resource for San Francisco during the Gold Rush era when egg companies began harvesting bird eggs on the islands. In 1863, violence between rival egg companies erupted on the islands (known as the “Egg War”), which inadvertently attracted national attention and provoked law makers to pass legislation to protect and rehabilitate the islands’ natural ecosystem.

In 1881, an executive order was passed that decreed egging illegal on the Farallons. This ended private enterprises on the islands and was reinforced in 1909 when President Theodore Roosevelt created the Farallon Reservation to restrict human access and preserve the northern islands. Protection was expanded in 1967 to include all the Farallon Islands, and over time many of the islands’ original inhabitants have returned.

The Farallons are now home to the world’s largest population of western gulls. Seals have returned, as well as otters and sea lions, which in turn attracts great white sharks. The combination of sharks, underwater currents, and jagged coastline are probably what earned the Farralons their nickname, “Devil’s Teeth,” though it hasn’t stopped a few adventurous people from swimming. Four people have completed the 30-mile swim from the islands to San Francisco; the fasted person completed the journey in 14 hours.

Question: Which of the following supports the detail that the Farallon Islands are a natural home to many animals?

A. Abundant land

B. Human presence

C. Lush landscape

D. Ocean currents

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Please pick your answers. We will then verify them.

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I thought that the answer might have been D, due to the sentence in the first paragraph which states "they are positioned in a major ocean current, which enables them to house dense populations of birds, rodents, seals, and other water mammals."

However, I feel as though answer A, abundant land, can also be the answer as an abundant land would support the idea that the Farallon Islands are a natural home to many animals.

Please help. Thank you!

grape lime 645However, I feel as though answer A, abundant land, can also be the answer as an abundant land

What does "abundant" mean?

Plentiful

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Actually it implies a very large area of land.

Yeesh. Anyone else care to help?

Hello, Grape Lime. Welcome to englishforums.com.

When you spend some more time here you will get to know the members better. I have been on the forum for the past 15 years. After AlpheccaStar responds to any of my question, I hardly need anyone else.

Tom

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grape lime 645Yeesh.

Does the passage say that these islands have large areas of land?

Here is an aerial view. There are two or three very small cottages on the islands. The passage actually gives the total land area as half a square kilometer, so you could walk around the entire island in less than 30 minutes.

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