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In the first 9 months of 2000, fishery sector in the whole country exploited and raised more than 1.54 million tons of various products, a 12.1 % increase against the same period last year, exporting 202,290 tons with 959 million US dollar of export turnover, a 39% increase and accounting for 87.2% of the whole year export plan.

If I don't want to use raised, can I use reared? If not, why?

If yes,what is the difference in meaning btw raise and rear?Are they interchangeable in this context?Why?

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You are confusing two different meanings of the word raise.

Raise – increase, inflate, put up. That is the meaning intended above.

Another meaning of raise is to bring up, educate, nurture. Farmers raise animals. Parents raise their children. This is the only meaning of raise for which 'rear' is a synonym. As you can see, it is not appropriate in this context.
an idiom has just entered my mind: something rear/raise its ugly head.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
The idiom is reared its ugly head.

Rear as in a rearing horse.
Hi Nona,

What is your point?
Hi,

Raise – increase, inflate, put up. That is the meaning intended above.

No, the meaning I itended above is both to bring up animals and to grow plants.

In this case, are raise and rear interchangeable?

Q
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes for animals. See the two quotes below:

"How must it be to tend your bit of land and sow crops and vegetables and perhaps rear animals, knowing you were building up a comfortable home and an inheritance for your children and then see your children taken and forced into slavery by the Robemaker?"
Rebel angel. Wood, B. London: Headline Book Publishing plc, 1993

"Personally, I don't even eat chicken; I prefer my protein to come from eggs, fish and cheese; but that is a personal choice based on my own unhappiness at the way we raise animals for slaughter."
Total health and fitness. Webb, Lizzie. London: Boxtree, 1989

Hope that helps...
And after searching the Concise Oxford Dictionary on AskOxford.com it's okay for plants too:

rear2

• verb 1 bring up and care for (offspring). 2 breed or cultivate (animals or plants). 3 (of an animal) raise itself upright on its hind legs. 4 (of a building, mountain, etc.) extend or appear to extend to a great height. 5 (rear up) show anger or irritation.

raise

• verb 1 lift or move to a higher position or level. 2 set upright. 3 increase the amount, level, or strength of. 4 promote to a higher rank. 5 cause to be heard, felt, or considered: doubts have been raised. 6 build (a structure). 7 collect or levy (money or resources). 8 generate (an invoice or other document). 9 bring up (a child). breed or grow (animals or plants). wake from sleep or bring back from death. abandon or force to abandon (a blockade, embargo, etc.). drive (an animal) from its lair. Brit. informal establish contact with (someone), especially by telephone or radio. (raise something to) Mathematics multiply a quantity to (a specified power).

Hope that helps...
However looking at your sentence:

"In the first 9 months of 2000, the fishery sector in the whole country exploited and raised more than 1.54 million tons of various products..."

I think 'produced' would perhaps be better than either 'raised' or 'reared'...

I would change it to:

"In the first 9 months of 2000, the fishery sector produced more than 1.54 million tons of various products..."

It doesn't scan that well, but introducing raised here is confusing as you can see from the responses that you have had...

Hope that helps...
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