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Hi,

I got this "A flood of this scale was obviously not a regular occurrence, which has led people to seek an answer for its happening" from a bbc webpage and "
the relationship between sth that happens and the reason for it happening; the principle that nothing can happen without a cause " from an Oxford dictionary for the definition of "causality". Are "it" and "its" can be used interchangeably in those sentences?

Thanks in advance for your answer with explanation.
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'Its' is still formally correct; 'it' is very common in less formal writing.
Comments  
Thank you, Mister Micawber, for your prompt reply.

Somehow "it" in the sentence "the relationship between sth that happens and the reason for it happening" seems to me more like referring to the "reason" rather than the "relationship" -- that it is the "reason" which is happening, and not the "relationship" (or I have missed something important here).

But I do agree with you that "it" is very common, and so came this question of mine.

Thank you again for sharing.