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I have made up (1) below.

(1) I haven't seen Joe for a long time. Yesterday, I received his recent photo/video.

My non-native English speaking friends think "his recent photo/video" is wrong.

It should be: (2) ... Yesterday, I received a recent photo/video of him.

I don't see anything wrong with my wording, his recent photo/video.

Why can't you say "his recent photo" or "his recent video"? It has to be "a recent photo of him" and "a recent video of him.

I'm very confused about this. Please explain it. Thank you very much for your time and help.

Comments  
ansonguyMy non-native English speaking friends think "his recent photo/video" is wrong.

They are right.

ansonguyWhy can't you say "his recent photo" or "his recent video"?

That is a hard question. We do say "his photo" to mean a photo of him and not one that he owns. We can even say "his most recent photo" or "his passport photo". But when you say "his recent photo", there is a disagreement of specificity. If the photo is recent, it is one of an unspecified number of photos. "His photo", on the other hand, is a known photo. That's the best I can do. The impossibility of "his recent photo" is patent to the native ear, and I am just trying to say why. Hope this helps.