Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red Seeded Grapes," but when I got the grapes home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.
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Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red Seeded Grapes," but when I got the grapes home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

See how dumbed down English has got? The label should've read "Seedy Red Grapes" and then you would've been properly forewarned.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. Unmunged email: /at/easypeasy.com
"Impatience is the mother of misery."
Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red Seeded Grapes," but when I got the grapes home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

I picked up one of those boxes last Friday; just around a corner of the display was another stack of boxes labeled "Red Seedless Grapes". I wonder why anyone buys "seeded" grapes.
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Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red ... home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

See how dumbed down English has got? The label should've read "Seedy Red Grapes" and then you would've been properly forewarned.

Well, I wouldn't say they were seedy, really. There were only two or three seeds in each one.
I think it should have said "Red Grapes That Have Not Been Seeded."

I was going to suggest "Unseeded Grapes," but that could still mean the seeds were taken out.
Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red Seeded Grapes," but when I got the grapes home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

I suppose the point is that they should have been labelled "Red-Seeded Grapes"; but right use of the hyphen has gone the way of all English down the toilet.
I wonder why anyone buys "seeded" grapes.

Yes, or "pitted" cherries. Who wants cherries with pits put into them?
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Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red ... home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

I suppose the point is that they should have been labelled "Red-Seeded Grapes"; but right use of the hyphen has gone the way of all English down the toilet.

But were the seeds red? I don't think so. Then again, the meaning that they have seeds sure comes across, the hyphenated "Red" being just a red herring.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
http://www.geocities.com/opus731/
Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red Seeded Grapes,"but when I got the grapes home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

That's odd. When I got mine home they were seeded but none of the seeds were red.
RY
Yesterday I bought a plastic box of grapes labeled "Red ... home I discovered that none of them had been seeded.

I suppose the point is that they should have been labelled "Red-Seeded Grapes"; but right use of the hyphen has gone the way of all English down the toilet.

But the grapes are red, the seeds are likely green-brown. "Red Grapes" would work fine. But, as someone suggested, they were being differentiated from seedless grapes.
Jeff

The rich don't care for anybody but themselves;
it's only the poor that have feeling for the poor, and help them. Mark Twain
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