Hi
I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine?? should I only say I will have red wine or should I have to say the brand?? or should I have I will have a glass or red wine?? which one is use in North America? thanks
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Hi I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine??

Plonk!
should I only say I will have red wine or should I have to say the brand?? or should I have I will have a glass or red wine?? which one is use in North America?

Well, you'll get different answers from different folks. Tony Cooper would solve the problem by ordering a medium-size (sic) RC Cola.
Hi I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine?? should I only ... brand?? or should I have I will have a glass or red wine?? which one is use inNorth America? thanks

There is often a list showing which wines are available by the glass. If there is only one Pinot Noir available by the glass, then "I'll have a glass of the Pinot" is what I would say. If there are two, I would ask for the one I prefer by name. For example, "I'll have a glass of the DRC Romanée-Conti, please." If there is no list, then I just ask "Which wines are available by the glass?" and follow the same procedure.

Regards,
John
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Hi I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine??

Plonk!

Whilst etymology is a poor guide to usage, on principle I apply that only to cheap white wine.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
Hi I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine?? should I only ... or should I have I will have a glass or red wine?? which one is use in North America? thanks

Yes, you will be well understood if you say "I would like a glass of red wine." Most restaurants that serve wine will have a "house red" and a "house white", which they serve to customers who order this way. If the restaurant is any good, the house wines will be at least acceptable.
(This won't work in dry locales in the U.S., or in the part of North America that is Mexico.)

Chris Green
Hi I wonder what should I say if I go to a restaurant and order red wine?? should I only ... or should I have I will have a glass or red wine?? which one is use in North America? thanks

It is entirely dependent on the restaurant and your desire.

"I'll have a glass of red" would get you a glass of "house" red wine in most restaurants. The "house" label being the wine that the restaurant offers for sale as the standard wine for people that order by the glass. The better the restaurant, the better the standard.

Some restaurants offer more than one choice by the glass. This is usually specified on the menu. It's perfectly acceptable to ask the waiter what is available in red wine by the glass. He'll tell you the types and brands available.
You will also run into the "house" wines being offered by the carafe. This is a larger container of wine and usually provides two or three glasses of wine. It's usually more economical than ordering two glasses of wine separately.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Do you think our poor leza will be able to pronounce Pinot Noir. She's better off sticking to Italian Swiss or Mogen David.

I only entered this thread for this aside: My cousin married a Frenchman. They opened a boutique in Lincolnshire, IL a town well known to the artsy-fartsy crowd. A prosperous-looking customer walked in and demonstrated a great interest in my their selection of imported items. Her hopes for a profitable encounter were raised when the prospect asked her husband for his business card. Her hopes were quickly dashed when the "customer" flipped the card over and asked her husband to spell "Pinot Noir."
Plonk!

Whilst etymology is a poor guide to usage, on principle I apply that only to cheap white wine.

Wine is red. Plonk is red. Urine is yellow to white.

Rob Bannister
Excellent advice. That's certainly what I do in Australia, although the selection is undoubtedly rather different from what you would have. (Pinot Noir, Shiraz, Cabernet-Sauvignon, Merlot would be the most likely offerings.)

Rob Bannister
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