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You know it's one of a series, don't you? McClure wrote several books about the same policemen. I've never seen any of the other books in my favorite used bookstores.

In case anyone is wondering, the complete series is:

The Steam Pig (1971)
The Caterpillar Cop (1972)
The Gooseberry Fool (1974)
Snake (1975)
The Sunday Hangman (1977)
The Blood of an Englishman (1980)
The Artful Egg (1984)
The Song Dog (1991)
I keep meaning to dig into, but never get a round tuit.
OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW.

Know what makes me really, really happy? Reading a book recommendation in AUE, going to my library's web site, and requesting the book. Ahh... modern life is wonderful.

SML
Dignity, always dignity.
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I think the proper term is "lawyer's bookcases". See: http://tinyurl.com/5peyd I'm not sure if the apostrophe is required, but it makes me feel comfortable.

They're also called "barristers' bookcases", though nobody but me seems to use the apostrophe.
Looking at that image again, that's not what I have. Mine are antiques, and separate sections for each shelf. The one in the image seems to be one-piece construction. The image shows the general style, though.

I think the key characteristic is that they have glass doors that open upward. Mine isn't quite old enough to be antique, but it is multi- piece, which makes it much easier to move. I've seen very utilitarian metal ones in battleship gray, which I assume would still be called by the same name even though no self-respecting lawyer (or barrister) would have them in his office.

Ray Heindl
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OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highlyrecommend BTW.

Know what makes me really, really happy? Reading a bookrecommendation in AUE, going to my library's web site, and requesting the book. Ahh... modern life is wonderful.Aren't those web-based library interfaces great?

Brian
You know it's one of a series, don't you? McClure ... any of the other books in my favorite used bookstores.

In case anyone is wondering, the complete series is: The Steam Pig (1971) The Caterpillar Cop (1972) The Gooseberry Fool ... The Artful Egg (1984) The Song Dog (1991) I keep meaning to dig into, but never get a round tuit.

I've got them all, and they're good reads not just because of the cops and robbers aspects, but also their insights into the social conditions obtaining in SA. Similarly, the series of crime thrillers by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö set in Sweden during the 1970s open one's eyes to how the poor live in this archetypal welfare state.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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In case anyone is wondering, the complete series is: The ... meaning to dig into, but never get a round tuit.

I've got them all, and they're good reads not just because of the cops and robbers aspects, but also their ... Wahlöö set in Sweden during the 1970s open one's eyes to how the poor live in this archetypal welfare state.

Henning Mankell, too.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I've got them all, and they're good reads not just because of the cops and robbers aspects, but also their ... Wahlöö set in Sweden during the 1970s open one's eyes to how the poor live in this archetypal welfare state.

I read the whole series (took awhile to track down "The Fire Engine That Disappeared"). I even bought a kid's CD so I could hear "The Laughing Policeman".
In case anyone is wondering, the complete series is: The ... meaning to dig into, but never get a round tuit.

I've got them all, and they're good reads not just because of the cops and robbers aspects, but also their ... Wahlöö set in Sweden during the 1970s open one's eyes to how the poor live in this archetypal welfare state.

As does Smilla's Sense of Snow, somewhat later on.
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I've got them all, and they're good reads not just ... to how the poor live in this archetypal welfare state.

Henning Mankell, too.

Yes, he's good too, and writing about today's Sweden. But reading several in a row, as I recently did, makes me wonder how a guy who never seems to have his gun, torch, pen, paper... available when he needs them most could bumble through as a police inspector. And his love life is almost as non-existent as Morse's!
What also strikes me about these books, which were written in Swedish, is the clarity and simplicity of the English translations.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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