OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW. It's set in S. Africa in 1971, and at one point the Afrikaans (1) policeman is trying to find out which optician was patronized by the murder victim. It turns out to be an immigrant from England (Reading) So after the optician leaves, the detective asks his partner:
"How was she to know he was a redneck? Look at this list she could have picked any one of them. They're not all from overseas."

So it sounds like "redneck" means "foreigner" in S. African. Is that right? In any event it's different from the American usage. What's the derivation?

"This very small sucker is nearly finished."
"Look in your pocket."
"Hau!"
"Yes, so you see you are not the only one who is clever with pockets, little tsotsi ."
(1) Can that apply to a person, or just the language?
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So it sounds like "redneck" means "foreigner" in S. African. Is that right? In any event it's different from the American usage. What's the derivation?

The Afrikaans word is "Roineck", used to refer to the English, as opposed to the Afrikaaners.
I believe it used because the English were considered to have fair skins and burnt easily, unaccustomed to the African sun, in contrast to the seasoned Boers (farmers).
Afrikaaner is the person, Afrikaans the lingo.
Bloke
OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW. It's set in S. Africa in 1971,

My God, but that's an old book. I read it years and years ago. Recently, I moved some lawyer's bookcases to paint the wall behind them and reassessed what books in it I wanted to keep around. I re-read "The Steam Pig", but discarded it later. Too many books, and too little room.
You know it's one of a series, don't you? McClure wrote several books about the same policemen. I've never seen any of the other books in my favorite used bookstores.
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OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW. It's set in S. Africa in 1971,

My God, but that's an old book. I read it years and years ago. Recently, I moved some lawyer's bookcases to paint the wall behind them and reassessed what books in it I wanted to keep around.

You mean, you don't even know the lawyer whose bookcases you were thinking about raiding?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
My God, but that's an old book. I read it ... reassessed what books in it I wanted to keep around.

You mean, you don't even know the lawyer whose bookcases you were thinking about raiding?

I think the proper term is "lawyer's bookcases". See: I'm not sure if the apostrophe is required, but it makes me feel comfortable.
You mean, you don't even know the lawyer whose bookcases you were thinking about raiding?

I think the proper term is "lawyer's bookcases". See: I'm not sure if the apostrophe is required, but it makes me feel comfortable.

Looking at that image again, that's not what I have. Mine are antiques, and separate sections for each shelf. The one in the image seems to be one-piece construction. The image shows the general style, though.
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You mean, you don't even know the lawyer whose bookcases you were thinking about raiding?

I think the proper term is "lawyer's bookcases". See: I'm not sure if the apostrophe is required, but it makes me feel comfortable.

Be that as it may, my interpretation is another perfectly good one. (It was a feeble joke, BTW.)

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW. It's set in S. Africa in ... means "foreigner" in S. African. Is that right? In any event it's different from the American usage. What's the derivation?

It means Brit.
It refers to the pale and rickety Brits who came here before Clean Air Acts and the like, who had never been exposed to ultra-violet rays because it was filtered through fog.
When they came to South Africa and went out into the sun, their pale necks turned red.
"This very small sucker is nearly finished." "Look in your pocket." "Hau!" "Yes, so you see you are not the only one who is clever with pockets, little tsotsi ."

From the context, the "Vnilla Glory" was probably an ice lolly - ice cream on a stick, since it is referred to as a "sucker". "Sucker" is a comon term for a lolly or lollipop.
(1) Can that apply to a person, or just the language?

Yes, just like "English", as in "an English policeman". In that context it would mean a white English-speaking South African policeman, who might or might not be referred to as a "rooinek" (redneck) or "soutie" (salty).

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
OK. I'm reading The Steam Pig by James McClure, which I highly recommend BTW. It's set in S. Africa in 1971,

My God, but that's an old book. I read it years and years ago. Recently, I moved some lawyer's bookcases ... wrote several books about the same policemen. I've never seen any of the other books in my favorite used bookstores.

I found it at my local library after seeing it on several "top 100 whodunnits of all time" lists. I would definitely read more books in the series if I could find them.
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