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Although only formally established as a discipline within the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences in April 2000, Nutrition has been an implicit feature of much of the research done in this Faculty for many years.

I read the above sentence and realized the subject (Nutrition) and verb (was) are missing in the adverbial clause.

1) I didn't think adverbial clauses beginning with 'although' could be reduced. Is the verb to be an exception, since I know that other verbs cannot be reduced when although is the subordinator?

Although I walked home, I..

Although walking home



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2) It isn't a reduced adverbial, but is it just a simple ellipsis?

it is best to avoid placing it before the subject as (I have) done in the original above?



Thanks
Comments  
I'm not following this. Maybe I'm not familiar with your terminology or analytical method.

Is there a strict definition of "reduce" that you are using? If so, what is it?
Similarly for "ellipsis". What definition are you using?

Is there a precise way to distinguish one from the other? (Because I have always thought that both reduction and ellipsis involved the omitting of words.)

I don't see anything special about although-clauses with regard to the verb to be, and there's no reason to avoid placing such a clause initially. Maybe I don't understand the question. Sorry.

Emotion: sad

CJ
Very sorry, CJ.

Question 2 relates to the sentence below it. The sentence below it is made up and has nothing to do with the former question. It is only similar in that they both are discussing reductions.

Ignore my terminology. When you search reduced adverbial clauses, they use the term reduction, so I assumed this term was used specifically for certain structures, whereas I assumed the term ellipsis was more the reduction of any word(s) of any structure, when the words aren't necessary as they are obvious to the reader.
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English 1b3When you search reduced adverbial clauses, they use the term reduction, so I assumed this term was used specifically for certain structures, whereas I assumed the term ellipsis was more the reduction of any word(s) of any structure, when the words aren't necessary as they are obvious to the reader.
Yes. Actually, that rings true to me. I, too, hear the word ellipsis used in a more general way.

But I still don't quite understand the first question. Is there a list somewhere of the kinds of clauses (when, although, after, since, etc.) paired up with the ways each can or cannot be reduced, for example, with respect to the verb to be or with respect to omitting the subject and so on? I have never seen a list like that, but I wouldn't mind taking a look if you have link.

I'm afraid that I only go by "what sounds right" when it comes to subtle details like those, but I don't doubt that some scholars somewhere have developed a more systematic set of principles. (I am not one of them!)

Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

CJ
CalifJim
But I still don't quite understand the first question. Is there a list somewhere of the kinds of clauses (when, although, after, since, etc.) paired up with the ways each can or cannot be reduced, for example, with respect to the verb to be or with respect to omitting the subject and so on? I have never seen a list like that, but I wouldn't mind taking a look if you have link.

Unfortunately, the only site I can offer doesn't mention any restrictions on reductions as such, but rather explains how while, when, after, before, and because can be reduced. I just assumed this list was exhaustive, but perhaps not.

So have you any idea why the one crossed out doesn't work but the rest do?

Although I walked home, I

Although walking home, I

When I walked home, I

When walking home, I

Although it was only formally established...

Although only formally established...
English 1b3So have you any idea why the one crossed out doesn't work but the rest do?
No. None. Not at all. This is the sort of thing I was talking about earlier when I said that some scholars somewhere have probably studied this -- but not me. Emotion: big smile

You might try Google as a research tool. Maybe you can find one of those scholarly papers on the subject. Who knows? If you do, let me know what you find. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJim
English 1b3So have you any idea why the one crossed out doesn't work but the rest do?
No. None. Not at all. This is the sort of thing I was talking about earlier when I said that some scholars somewhere have probably studied this -- but not me.

You might try Google as a research tool. Maybe you can find one of those scholarly papers on the subject. Who knows? If you do, let me know what you find.

CJ

Although angry and upset, I put on my happy face.

Just odd how it works with adjectives...

Searching through scholarly papers sounds laborious to say the least. But if I come accross something, I'll be sure to notify you. Emotion: smile