+0
Adverbial clauses can be reduced by omitting the subject and the verb to be:

Why does the reduced version in bold have the word being inserted. I'm pretty sure it's just because it is passive voice and thus requires it the verb to be, but I want a further explanation of possible Emotion: smile

He was sent to hospital after he was attacked by a man.

He was sent to hospital after being attacked by a man=reduced

-------------

But why is being inserted in this sentence? Is it implying it was progresive aspect or what?

He will try to blind you with references to his own success, while being incompetent and expecting you to pick up the pieces.

Wouldn't the original have been this?

He will try to blind you with references to his own success, while he was incompetent and expecting you to pick up the pieces.

Thanks a load.
Comments  
English 1b3Adverbial clauses can be reduced by omitting the subject and the verb to be
True, but none of your examples illustrate this principle. The following does, however.

To open, press down while (you are) twisting the cap counterclockwise.

Your quoted examples may be illustrations of some other principle.

CJ
CalifJimTrue, but none of your examples illustrate this principle. The following does, however.

To open, press down while (you are) twisting the cap counterclockwise.

Your quoted examples may be illustrations of some other principle.

CJ


I'm afraid I don't quite get you. How are they not examples of a reduced clause? Both the subject and verb are left out in the final sentence.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
English 1b3I'm afraid I don't quite get you.
"by omitting the subject and the verb to be"

The quoted examples do not omit the verb to be. They contain being, a form of to be.

(My example leaves out the subject (you) and the verb to be (are). twisting is all that remains.)

CJ
That's just my question. Being is almost inserted.

He will try to blind you with references to his own success, while being incompetent and expecting you to pick up the pieces.

What kind of construction is the underlined clause?

Wouldn't you agree it is a reduced adverbial clause, with the subject 'he' and the verb to be 'is' omitted?

I see it as a reduced adverbial clause, but the insertion of 'being' confuses me.

Thanks
"Adverbial clauses can be reduced by omitting the subject and the verb to be."

OK. That's ONE way to reduce adverbial clauses.
____________

"Adverbial clauses can be reduced by omitting the subject and expressing the verb in its -ing form."

OK. That's ANOTHER way to reduce adverbial clauses.

... while he is incompetent ... >>> while being incompetent ...

... when a person drives drunk ... >>> when driving drunk ...

... after she went to the bank ... >>> after going to the bank ...

There's nothing special about the verb to be in this pattern; it just becomes being, like drives becomes driving, and went becomes going.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
The problem still remains for me

Simple present and past:

1.While I walked home, I ...

1a.While walking home, I...

Progressive aspect:

2.While I was walking home, I...

2a.While walking home, I...

Linking Verb:

3a.While he is incompetent, he..

3b.While being incompetent, he...

but then sometimes, being doesn't have to be inserted in such cases:

3c.While I was angry, I...

3c.While angry, I...

What makes some of them include 'being' and others not?

Thanks
English 1b3What makes some of them include 'being' and others not?
Author's choice. There is no rule stating that one and only one way of reducing an adverbial clause must be used, and what that way is for any given case.

while/though I was angry ~ while/though being angry ~ while/though angry ~ being angry

As for the question of tenses, the reduced forms are non-finite, i.e., have no tense (or aspect) of their own; they take their tense from the main clause.

When driving in England, Americans often become confused.
= When they [drive / are driving] in England, ... become ....

When driving in England, I became confused.
= When I [drove / was driving] in England, ... became ....

CJ

Hi . I had the same question until i found this answer in TESL Time site:

Reducing Passive Adverb Clauses:

When reducing passive clauses there are three things to keep in mind:

  • Passive clauses reduce to the pp form. [like with group one adjective clauses]
  • Whatever word occupies the space right after the subordinator in the passive dependent clause has to have the same meaning as the word that begins the independent clause.[There's a strategy for doing this.]
  • Add "being" to the reduced form after the subordinators "Since", "While", "After", and "Before". [can be remembered as "SWAB"]

hope clear now

love

J. R from Iran

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.