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1. The man who drives the car every day is my brother.
2. The man who drove the car yesterday is my brother.
3. The man driving the car every day is my brother.
4. The man driving the car yesterday is my brother.
Which of the above sentences is NOT acceptable?

PS. The typo in #4 has been corrected.
1 2
Comments  
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They are all acceptable, but I suggest that # 2 and #4 (which needs a capital 'T') seem a bit awkward with the mixed tenses.
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Typical mistake: *The boy bringing the milk has been ill.
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After a noun which refers to something 'definite' (a particular person, thing, group, etc), a participle clause usually has a progressive meaning.
I like the girl sitting on the right. (Or: . . . who is sitting . . .)
The men working on the site were in some danger. (Or: . . . who were working . . .)
To express a non-progressive meaning, use a relative clause.
The boy who brings the milk has been ill.
The man who threw the bomb was arrested. (Not: *. . . the man throwing . . .)
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(Practical English Usage, 1st edition, section 454, point 3, Michael Swan)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
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Sure, but so what?

3. The man who is driving the car every day is my brother.
4. The man was driving the car yesterday is my brother.
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3. The man who is driving the car every day is my brother.
4. The man who was driving the car yesterday is my brother.
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Yes; I'm typing too fast and trying to get some editing work done here at home at the same time!
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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
5. A tile which fell from a roof shattered into fragments.
6. A tile falling from a roof shattered into fragments.

Does #5 have the same meaning as #6?
Mister Micawber.

3. The man who is driving the car every day is my brother.
4. The man who was driving the car yesterday is my brother.
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Do you mean that 1 and 2 don't have the same meanings as 3 and 4 respectively?
You have to read this part carefully:
To express a non-progressive meaning, use a relative clause.
The boy who brings the milk has been ill.
Mr. Swan never says it is WRONG to write "The boy bringing the milk has been ill." He simply states that "to express a non-progressive meaning, use a relative clause."

1. The boy who brings the milk has been ill.

Meaning: This boy has been ill. What boy? The boy with the job bringing the milk (to a place) every day or on certain days of the week. So "He brings the milk" simply expresses a general idea, not something he is doing right at this moment. It has a non-progressive meaning, and that's why Mr. Swan put this sentence there. He didn't add "NOT ... bringing ..." next to this sentence(, did he?)

2. The boy bringing the milk has been ill.

Meaning: Well, what's wrong with this expression if I spot him carrying the milk right at this moment?
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