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a- I gave a book, which was written by Hemingway, to Mary last week.

b- I gave a book, written by Hemingway, to Mary last week.

As far as I know I can reduce the sentence a to b. But here the website says I can't because the fact that "the relative clause "which was written by Hemingway" modifies an object of the verb give." But for me, it is clear that the relative clause modifies the noun which is next to it. (Website: )

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mango pen 189the website says I can't because the fact that "the relative clause "which was written by Hemingway" modifies an object of the verb give."

I have never heard of that rule.

mango pen 189But for me, it is clear that the relative clause modifies the noun which is next to it.

For me as well.

I'd say that both sentences (a and b) are correct, but I think I'd interpret the modifying clauses as restrictive and omit the commas.

CJ

Comments  
mango pen 189"the relative clause "which was written by Hemingway" modifies an object of the verb give." But for me, it is clear that the relative clause modifies the noun which is next to it.

The direct object of the verb "gave" is "a book", a noun, which is followed the relative clause. The comment refers to the same word, namely "a book".

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So, is the sentence b grammatically correct as is?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I have sympathy for the website's point. Such a parenthetical comment normally applies to the subject (I gave a book, sitting on my shelf, to Mary.) Delete the commas, and the problem goes away. They don't belong there, anyway.

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