Hi,

Can conditional clauses be reduced in the same manner as adverb clauses of time?

While John was riding his bike, he hit a dog.

While riding his bike, he hit a dog.

Can if, unless, only if, in the case that, etc... be reduced in the same manner? (omit subject, omit beV or V+ing, or even omit the subordinating conjunctions?)

Thank you for your time.
Hi

Yes, it can work with "if". I think the following are OK..

If I get to the station early, I'll have time for a sandwich

vs

If early, I can get a sandwich

Only if he is careful will he make it to the end of the track

vs

Only if careful will he make it

I'm less certain about "unless" or "in the case that"

Regards, Dave
Hi,

Your example "If I get to the station early, I'll have time for a sandwich."

You reduced it to If early, ... What about "to the station"? Doesn't this leave out certain information which is suppose to be in the sentence?

Also, I remembered fragments of a sentence, don't know if it is right(reduced or a whole new sentence structure).

If I were to arrive at the station early, I would grab something to eat.

Were I to arrive at the station early, I would grab something to eat.

Are these two sentences correct?
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Hi,

Your example "If I get to the station early, I'll have time for a sandwich."

You reduced it to If early, ... What about "to the station"? Doesn't this leave out certain information which is suppose to be in the sentence?

Can the sentence be rephrased into: "If early to (arrive at) the station, I'll have time for a sandwich."?

Also, I remembered fragments of a sentence, don't know if it is right(reduced or a whole new sentence structure).

If I were to arrive at the station early, I would grab something to eat.

Were I to arrive at the station early, I would grab something to eat.

Are these two sentences correct?

(sorry for double posting)
Speaking purely from a logic perspective,
holyduke"If I get to the station early, I'll have time for a sandwich."[/quote] this is the only logical and syntactically sound sentence in my opinion.

holydukeCan if, unless, only if, in the case that, etc... be reduced in the same manner? (omit subject, omit beV or V+ing, or even omit the subordinating conjunctions?)
I think a blanket answer will be inaccurate. It's a "yes" and "no" answer.

Unless someone is authorized to use the lab, no one should be in there

We can rewrite and reduce the clause to " unless authorized, no one should be in the lab."

holydukeWhile John was riding his bike, he hit a dog.
While riding his bike, he hit a dog.[/quote]

The example, " he hit a dog", is the main message. So personally I prefer writing the sentence with the adverbial at the end, " John hit a dog while (being) out riding his bike."


Thank you for the suggestion.

So besides the adverb clauses of time and reason (no wonder I can't find anything beside these two), there aren't blanket rules for reduction.

Thanks again Emotion: smile
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