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Not much of an English language problem, but in a US law firm, would a partner refer a manager in the firm as "his/her colleague" in correspondence or introduction?

Would it be more appropriate to state "my manager" or "a manager" instead of just "a colleague" or "one of my colleague"?
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I would think "colleague" but I don't know for sure. But certainly, if you use "one of my colleagues" make sure colleagues is plural.
I believe if A is a partner and B is his manager, B would also be a senior partner. I don't think "colleague" would be used. If A doesn't wish to refer to B as "his manager" and the relationship isn't material to the subject at hand, he could call him a senior partner in the firm, or just another partner in the firm.

Perhaps someone else has more experience in law offices.

- A.
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Hi,

Here's a small comment about the thread's title, ie Referring to a staff in a law firm.

The word 'staff' is a group term that refers to all the employees.

An individual would not be a staff, but 'a member of the staff'.

In my experience, the term 'employees' is often used instead of the term 'staff'.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanx Clive for pointing out my two grammar mistakes in the thread.

Emotion: zip it
Avangi
I believe if A is a partner and B is his manager, B would also be a senior partner. I don't think "colleague" would be used. If A doesn't wish to refer to B as "his manager" and the relationship isn't material to the subject at hand, he could call him a senior partner in the firm, or just another partner in the firm.

Perhaps someone else has more experience in law offices.

- A.

In that case, B sounds like an associate. But I don't think a manager, no matter how senior he/she is, can be called "partner" anyhow. In my knowledge, a partner is the onwer of a law firm, whereas a manager is someone employed, who has the chance to become an associate, then the chance to make partner. Thus my question would be, can you refer to someone as a collegue if you're of different status like boss to employee?
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InfinikNot much of an English language problem, but in a US law firm, would a partner refer a manager in the firm as "his/her colleague" in correspondence or introduction?

Would it be more appropriate to state "my manager" or "a manager" instead of just "a colleague" or "one of my colleague"?

Our manager, our firm's manager, not colleague.
InfinikIn that case, B sounds like an associate. But I don't think a manager, no matter how senior he/she is, can be called "partner" anyhow. In my knowledge, a partner is the onwer of a law firm, whereas a manager is someone employed, who has the chance to become an associate, then the chance to make partner. Thus my question would be, can you refer to someone as a collegue if you're of different status like boss to employee?
Hi Infinik,

You stated in your original question that A was "a partner" and B was "his manager." You're absolutely right: partners in law firms are the owners. That's why I said that B must also be a partner, and a senior one at that, if he's telling partner A what to do. I really believe one partner in a law firm would refer to another partner in the same law firm as "John Brown, a partner in our firm," whether John Brown is his manager or not.

Regarding your new question, assuming we've demoted partner A to some kind of a law clerk, I agree with those who have said he should not refer to his manager as a colleague - although we recently had a college student in Japan join the Forums and refer to his professor as a colleague.

Best wishes, - A.
AvangiYou stated in your original question that A was "a partner" and B was "his manager." You're absolutely right: partners in law firms are the owners. That's why I said that B must also be a partner, and a senior one at that, if he's telling partner A what to do. I really believe one partner in a law firm would refer to another partner in the same law firm as "John Brown, a partner in our firm," whether John Brown is his manager or not.

Best wishes, - A.

OOOOOOOPS... I meant "a manager working for the partner"... gotcha, anyways.. Thanx -A Emotion: embarrassed
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