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Could you tell me which bold part you would say? Can you use REFLECT ON like that?
Which of the underlined sentences would you say? I've heard JUST LIKE used like this?

It's hard for the day workers just like it's hard for the night workers./It's hard for both the day workers and the night ones. The work that has to be done during the day reflects on the work that has to be done at night. If there is a lot of work to be done during the day, then there will be a lot of work at night.

The work that is done during the day is in direct proportion to the work that has to be done at night.

Thank you
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The use of "reflect on" doesn't work here, in my opinion.

The use of "direct proportion" is fine, but I reject your premise, having been involved in a lot of shift work. (It may be true in certain specific industries.)
Also, when B follows A in time, it's more natural to say that B is in direct proportion to A, not vice versa.

"Reflect on" is frequently used in a negative way: The quality of the product put out by the workers reflected [poorly] on the skill of the supervisor.

It's a little different without the "on."
His raise in pay reflected the boss's confidence in his ability.
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Thank you so much for the explanation.
alc24The work that has to be done during the day reflects on the work that has to be done at night.
In some specific situations, I suppose you might say, "The work to be done during the day reflects [on] the work that has been done on/during the previous night." (or vice versa)
I've known situations in which a particular manufacturing operation was performed on one shift only. A second or subsequent operation might be performed on the following shift (same workpieces).
If there had been a breakdown on the first operation, there would be no work for those who normally perform the second operation. (Of course a clever manager would find something for them to do.)
Thank you Avangi,

"The work to be done during the day reflects [on] the work that has been done on/during the previous night."

You said you could use "reflect on" but what would be your first choice? How would you say it?

Thank you
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Right. Let me think about it.
The problem with "reflect on" is that it's used in a "bad" way most of the time.
The teenager feared (was afraid) that her run-in with the police would reflect on her parents.
- That is, that other adults would think poorly of her parents because of it, either because of a distaste for scandal, or because they had failed as parents. (She didn't want to cause them embarrassment.)

Her friends told her not to worry, because in this day and age these things do not reflect on the parents.

(still thinking) Emotion: thinking