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regard something as (noun? adj?)

Can I use adjective after "as"? or should there only be a noun, after the as?

I don't quite understand why, in the following example, they follow the "as" with a gerund "being tentative," instead of just tentative.

e.g. we should regard all scientifc explanations as being tentative,

can i say:

we should regard all scientific explanations as tentative?

Comments  
Hi,

regard something as (noun? adj?)

Can I use adjective after "as"? Yes

or should there only be a noun, after the as?

I don't quite understand why, in the following example, they follow the "as" with a gerund "being tentative," instead of just tentative.

In this context at least, the 'being' form tends to imply that it is a temporary situation, ie one that exists right now.

e.g. we should regard all scientifc explanations as being tentative,

can i say:

we should regard all scientific explanations as tentative? Yes

Clive

we should regard all scientifc explanations as being tentative,

Both work.

Perhaps a similar expression will shed light on the [optional] use of "being":

We should look at all scientific explanations as if they were tentative.

In my opinion, "being" doesn't change the meaning.
It just causes us to focus on the state of tentativeness.

The sentence doesn't claim that they're all tentative.
It simply suggests taking that position as an approach, in my opinion.

Of course, the other meaning could have been intended.
But then perhaps it should read, "We must regard etc."
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CliveIn this context at least, the 'being' form tends to imply that it is a temporary situation, ie one that exists right now.
I agree. It reinforces "temporary."
akdomregard something as (noun? adj?)
Can I use adjective after "as"? or should there only be a noun, after the as?
I don't quite understand why, in the following example, they follow the "as" with a gerund "being tentative," instead of just tentative.
e.g. we should regard all scientifc explanations as being tentative,
But it's not a gerund - the non-finite subordinate clause 'being tentative' is a post-head modifier of the noun 'explanations'.
akdomcan i say:
we should regard all scientific explanations as tentative?
Yes, of course - 'tentative' is an adjective. The distinction between your two examples is very fine - basically the meanings are the same.

BillJ
BillJthe non-finite subordinate clause 'being tentative' is a post-head modifier of the noun 'explanations'.
Hi, Bill.

we should regard all scientifc explanations as being tentative,

we should regard all scientific explanations as tentative?

Can we also describe the adjective "tentative" in the second example as a post-head modifier of the noun "explanations"?

Many thanks, - A.
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Avangiwe should regard all scientific explanations as tentative?

Can we also describe the adjective "tentative" in the second example as a post-head modifier of the noun "explanations"?

Hi 'A'

No, 'explanations' is the direct object of 'regard', so 'as tentative' is an objective predicative complement in the form of a PP where 'as' is the preposition whose complement is the AdjP 'tentative'. In fact, on reflection, I'd say the same about the example with a subordinate clause, i.e. that's also a predicative complement!

BillJ
Thanks, Bill. My feel for this stuff is evolving more slowly than I had wished. Emotion: smile - A.