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Sentence: "It may not matter to you people like you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means."

My question is about the adverb "anyhow" and "by any means". Both have subtly different meanings and perhaps uses also. So, my question is which one would be grammartically correct in my sentence, "anyhow" or "by any means". If both are correct then please explain what is a difference between them? And what meaning they will make in the sentence?

Regards and thanksEmotion: smile
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Interesting question.
I assume you've looked all this stuff up, so I won't bother.

"Anyhow" is usually used as a dismissive sort of tag: "'cause I didn't like you anyhow." That is, it doesn't matter to me what you think, say, or do. It's a sour grapes kind of thing.

Of course, "anyhow" is also used as an introductory "remark," like "anyway," following the conclusion of some discussion. "Anyway, that's my opinion. I don't think it's a good idea."

"By any means" is used as a casual expression, but can also be used according to the dictionary definitions of the words.
"We must accomplish this task by any means that we can!"

I'm struggling for a good use of the expression. I'd say it's used something like "by any stretch of the imagination."

I heard you're the best there is. (reply) I wouldn't say that, by any means. That's not true, by any means.

"It may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means."

Of course we don't know the antecedent of "it."

There seem to be two issues at play, between two camps.

The first camp (the speaker's) is willing to sacrifice the person's skin in the interest of some unnamed principle.
The second camp is willing to sacrifice the principle in the interest of saving the person's skin.

The dismissive "anyhow" would be used as, "There's no point in arguing with you people about the principle, because you don't give a rat's behind. All you care about is saving this guy."

I take "by any means" according to the dictionary - not the "expression."

"Since you are willing to use any means available to save this guys skin, including sacrificing the principle, there's no point in discussing the principle with you. It doesn't matter to you."
It qualifies "save." - save by any means

So in my opinion, your two options have radically different meanings.
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RazerIt may not matter to you people like you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means.
The two don't mean the same thing.
Razergrammartically
When adding the ending -atical(ly), drop the ar of grammar.

gramm | ar
gramm | atical

gramm | atically

CJ
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Comments  
Avangi"It may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means."

Of course we don't know the antecedent of "it."

There seem to be two issues at play, between two camps.

The first camp (the speaker's) is willing to sacrifice the person's skin in the interest of some unnamed principle.
The second camp is willing to sacrifice the principle in the interest of saving the person's skin.

The dismissive "anyhow" would be used as, "There's no point in arguing with you people about the principle, because you don't give a rat's behind. All you care about is saving this guy."

I take "by any means" according to the dictionary - not the "expression."

"Since you are willing to use any means available to save this guys skin, including sacrificing the principle, there's no point in discussing the principle with you. It doesn't matter to you."

It qualifies "save." - save by any means

So in my opinion, your two options have radically different meanings.

Sir, first of all thanks a lot for answering. Appreciate your time and answerEmotion: smile. I tell you the antecedent of "it". But since I don't have command over the language, I could make it verbose. So, you may have to bear with me Emotion: smile.

The context of "it" is; today, one pro-establisment journalist sought the viewer's opinion by saying , "does it matter who let go Anderson (one of the accused in world's biggest gas tragedy), who helped him in getting bail?" "Which ministry did it?" Who pressed for it and on whose pressure he was released? Compensation is more important or retribution? The issue of gas tragedy issue has arisen due to the recent court verdict on this issue, and our parliament debated this issue today.

The ruling partly is currently is in a soup on this issue because it was ruling when the tragedy happened. I belong to the same city where this tragedy happened. Though, I wasn't born then, but have heard goose bumping stories about it. Therefore, I didn't like her callous remarks at all and wanted to tell her the same thing which I've said in my sentence Emotion: smile. Hope now you have got the antecedent of "it".

So, I feel your second camp guess was right.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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"It may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means."

I haven't had a chance to read the last few posts, but I realized that the dismissive anyhow has another sense which may also be appropriate in your example:
As in the song, "Mama Don't Allow No Singin' Around Here."

We don't care what Mama don't allow; We're gonna sing songs anyhow.

So "anyhow" could mean "regardless of what anyone else thinks or decides, you want to do it."

To us it matters a great deal. But it may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow.

I'll get back to your post.

Avangi"It may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow/by any means."I haven't had a chance to read the last few posts, but I realized that the dismissive anyhow has another sense which may also be appropriate in your example:As in the song, "Mama Don't Allow No Singin' Around Here."We don't care what Mama don't allow; We're gonna sing songs anyhow.So "anyhow" could mean "regardless of what anyone else thinks or decides, you want to do it."To us it matters a great deal. But it may not matter to you who want to save his skin anyhow.I'll get back to your post.
Thanks sir. I got the gist of the argument. Have nothing more to add. Will go with the adverb anyhow.