+0
This is just a general question to know whether parentheses comma can be used "when" multiple comms are coming after it. Like this for example : "He has ripped apart, most biased, most immoral, most corrupt, government organisation". Here in this example the perentheses comma has been used after the word "apart" and ends after the word "corrupt". So essentially we have put "most biased, most immoral, most corrupt" under the parentheses. This is just an example. My question is can parenthesis be used in this way? Can multiple commas follow parenthesis like in my sentence?

Thanks and regards
1 2
Comments  
I think the answer to your question is that the commas after "apart" and "corrupt" are not required, but it's a little difficult to be sure because the sentence is ungrammatical irrespective of the comma placement and it's not completely clear what was intended. The most obvious fix is to insert an article (or other determiner) before "most biased". Did you copy this from another source? If so, double-check that you've not introduced any typos.
No, I've not copied it from anywhere. Actually use of parentheses confuses me so I just created an example to explain my problem. It wasn't about example as I've mentioned in my question. So there is no problem even it's wrong, I just want to know the use of parenthesis in the mentioned situations is correct or not. I encounter many such situations while I do writing that's why I asked.

Have one request though please make a situation as suggested in my example, given the example
I suggested is ungrammatical, and tell me use of parenthesis would be correct in those types of situations or not.

Regards
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I don't feel your example is a good example of a parenthetical remark.

In general,if your parenthetical remark has commas, I'd suggest setting it off some other way, either with em-dashes or actual parentheses.

For example:

My teacher, a great big loud fellow with a long black beard, was such a sweetheart.

You can't really put another comma-needing phrase in there.

My teacher -- a great big loud fellow with a long black beard, which he sometimes braided for fun to match his braided hair -- was such a sweetheart.
Grammar GeekYou can't really put another comma-needing phrase in there.
My teacher -- a great big loud fellow with a long black beard, which he sometimes braided for fun to match his braided hair -- was such a sweetheart.
Thanks Grammar Geek. I agree with you dash would be much more appropriate in those situations than perenthesis comma. You really have resolved my confusion. Kudos to you. Thanks a ton.Emotion: smile

Regards
Well, the easiest thing is just to make the simple fix I suggested:

"He has ripped apart the most biased, most immoral, most corrupt government organisation."

There is no parenthesis involved here, just a series of adjectives that modify "government organisation".

For some typical examples of parenthetical commas, see http://editfast.com/english/grammar/commas/commas_parenthetical.htm or http://grammartips.homestead.com/interrupters.html
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks Mr. Wordy for your comment and time. Appreciate it. I shall go through the links provided by you. But do you agree dash can be used it situations mentioned by me? It could be a better choice? I mean it will not result in comma splice, no? Emotion: smile

Regards
RazerThanks Mr. Wordy for your comment and time. Appreciate it. I shall go through the links provided by you. But do you agree dash can be used it situations mentioned by me? It could be a better choice? I mean it will not result in comma splice, no?
Yes, dashes can be used in situations where you want to set off a parenthetical phrase which itself includes a comma, per GG's example. This would not be a comma splice.

Sorry, I was initially confused by the fact that your example sentence did not actually illustrate your question, and I kind of went off on the wrong track of trying to fix the example rather than answer the question...
Mr Wordy Yes, dashes can be used in situations where you want to set off a parenthetical phrase which itself includes a comma, per GG's example. This would not be a comma splice.
Thanks for clarifying this. My doubt regarding "commas within parentheses" was almost settle yesterday. But it's not so when I got wind today that I've posted the same question in another forum also in my bid to get the good understanding of the use of parentheses. One "VIP member" in the other forum told me that :

"If you take your parenthesis out, you don't have a proper sentence:

"He has ripped apart government organization".
So, it's not a parenthesis.

In theory, as I'm sure you'll find out, sooner or later, commas can occur within a parenthetical element."

The above contrary view by that VIP member has created a bit of confusion in me. I'm wondering whose explanation should I go with now! Do you agree with him?

** I've understood Grammar Geek's point, Wordy's point very well, but why is he contrarily "implying" that the use of parenthesis in my example is right! I shall provide the link of that forum if you want. **
Mr Wordy Sorry, I was initially confused by the fact that your example sentence did not actually illustrate your question, and I kind of went off on the wrong track of trying to fix the example rather than answer the question...
Oh! No problem. It happens sometimes Emotion: smile

PS: I could not reply yesterday as I didn't have access to internet, have just got access to internet few hours back .

Regards
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more