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Sentence: "But, our nation remains in peace when your types of journalist remains silent!"

My question: Whenever, I start my sentence with the conjunction "but" I remain in state of uncertaintity, regarding the use of comma. So, please explain to me should comma be put after the word "but" everytime we start the new sentence with it. Like in my case, because technically we are starting a new sentence?

Also tell, have I used the comma rightly, or have I done the comma splice in my sentence given above?

Second question is regarding the plural. Will the "s" comes in above sentence at the end of the word "type"?If yes, then please also tell why.Emotion: smile

Besides that, can we start the new sentence with the word "because"? Is it grammatically correct?

PS:If there are any other mistakes in my post like comma splice or grammatarical error then do point out it without hesitation. It helps me a lot because I can know where I've erred.Emotion: smile

Regards and thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  
Razershould a comma be put after the word "but" every time we start the a new sentence with it.
No, no, no! You almost never do that! Do that only in the rare case when there is a parenthetical phrase set off by two commas right after but.

But I was afraid.
But, considering the situation, I was afraid.

But our nation remains at peace when your type of journalist remains silent.
RazerWill Does the "s" comes come in above sentence at the end of the word "type" in the sentence above?
No. You need to preserve agreement between subject and verb: type remains.
Razercan we start the new sentence with the word "because"? Is it grammatically correct?
Yes, that's OK as long as you have a main clause after the because clause.

Because I was busy. (Wrong.)
Because I was busy, I could not go with them. (Right.)
RazerIf there are any other mistakes in my post
I think I've covered everything. Emotion: smile

CJ
Thanks. Very helpful.
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CalifJim
RazerWill Does the "s" comes come in above sentence at the end of the word "type" in the sentence above?
No. You need to preserve agreement between subject and verb: type remains.
Can we use "your types" or "your types journalist" in lieu of "your type of journalist"? One more question please, I have often seen people using comma after the word "yes" - I mean with those sentence starting with the word "yes". Then why the words "but" and "yes" are treated differently? I'm asking this because I want to there is any grammar reason behind it or it's just a case of exception.

Regards
RazerCan we use "your types" or "your types journalist" in lieu of "your type of journalist"?
You can use any of these:

... when your type of journalist remains silent. << I think this one is best.

... when your type remains silent.
... when your types of journalist remain silent.
... when your types remain silent.
... when journalists like you remain silent.

You can't use "your type journalist" or "your types journalist". You have to place "of" in between.

____________

Razercomma after the word "yes" - I mean with those sentence starting with the word "yes".
Yes, that's correct. You put a comma after certain words at the beginning of a sentence, and you just have to learn them. Some of them are yes, no, however, therefore, and nevertheless. There is no grammar rule.

You also put a comma after a name if you are talking directly to that person:

Peter, please close the door.

You don't put a comma after certain other words, like and, but, or, please, because, when, and so on.

CJ
CalifJimwhen your type of journalist remains silent
Yes, I also like this one. But isn't this appear like a comment on a singular journalist not "his types" ? Can it be a substitute for a plural ones like these "journalists like you" or "types of journalist"?
CalifJimYes, that's correct. You put a comma after certain words at the beginning of a sentence, and you just have to learn them. Some of them are yes, no, however, therefore, and nevertheless. There is no grammar rule.

You also put a comma after a name if you are talking directly to that person:

Peter, please close the door.

You don't put a comma after certain other words, like and, but, or, please, because, when, and so on.

Sir, this remark was very, very useful. Emotion: smile

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Razerlike a comment on a singular journalist
In a phrase like "type of journalist" or "types of journalist", the word "journalist" calls to mind everybody in the profession of journalism, not just one person who is a journalist. You do not need to say "journalists".

It still means "journalists like you" whether you say "your type of journalist" or "your types of journalist".

CJ
In fact ,i feel that you should not add a comma after but ,it is unnecessary ,what is more ,don't just use but to espress,you can change it with however,etc.
CalifJim
Razerlike a comment on a singular journalist
In a phrase like "type of journalist" or "types of journalist", the word "journalist" calls to mind everybody in the profession of journalism, not just one person who is a journalist. You do not need to say "journalists". It still means "journalists like you" whether you say "your type of journalist" or "your types of journalist".CJ
Thanks CalifJim sir. Now, all of my doubts are cleared. Learnt a new lessontoday. English is a bit 'complicated' language, but still a interested one Emotion: smile Smile. Clyvia, thanks for your remarks also. Owe a lot to this community without whom I couldn't have learnt many things about English. Nobody tells these small things in so much detail, not even a teacher these days. I've learn over 50% of my English with the help of you folks. Thanks once again folks.Emotion: smile Smile.
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