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Sentence: "He must pay the price of/for these crimes"

My question: Which preposition, of or for, would be 'appropriate' in the sentence ? My own sense is both are correct but I'm confused regarding the difference they(preposition) are creating. So there are two things I'd like to know from the members. First is whether both the prepositions are correct or not ? And secondly what difference they will make.

Thanks
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Comments  
He must pay the price for these crimes.
For me, only "for" works. "for" seems to have the required sense of a deserved consequence or punishment which "of" lacks. I find it quite hard to explain, though, because "pay the price of" sounds OK in seemingly similar contexts such as "Shareholders pay the price of failure" (a randomly Googled headline).
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Thanks Dave and Wordy. Wordy I can understand what you are trying...here is what another English teacher told me in another forum. Check this compressed link of that forum. http://budurl.com/5jas
The explanation at that forum was my first thought too. Unfortunately it does not seem to be the full answer because "pay the price of" is used figuratively (as in "pay the price of success" for example).
"Unfortunately it does not seem to be the full answer because "pay the price of" is used figuratively (as in "pay the price of success" for example)"

Hmmmm. So are we caught in a sort of catch 22 situation ?Emotion: big smile In the world of exceptions which i hate ?! Ok. Seriously the problem really seem to be serious. But I'm anyway going with 'for'. But I would still be interested in knowing the replies which can answer the question from both the angles of and for. Waiting for interesting and informed reply.Emotion: smile
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RazerBut I'm anyway going with 'for'.
Yes, there is no dispute that "for" is the correct choice in your sentence.
I see pay as a verb with two complements, either of which may be omitted.
The first is the amount, possibly expressed in terms of the price of something; the second is what is obtained in exchange for the payment.

He must pay $20.

He must pay [the price of $20].
He must pay for the book.

He must pay $20 for the book.
He must pay [the price of $20] for the book.

He must pay [the price of a book] for the meal.

He must pay [the price (e.g., of going to prison)] for (i.e., in exchange for; because of) these crimes.

CJ
CalifJimThe first is the amount, possibly expressed in terms of the price of something; the second is what is obtained in exchange for the payment.
It's true that in "He must pay the price of/for these crimes", the crimes are not the thing actually paid (i.e. an actual or figurative amount). However, I don't at the moment see how this explains why only "for" works. The same is true with "He must pay the price of/for success", for example, and "of" sounds fine to me in that sentence.
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