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Have three question regarding the uses of articles. I've forgotten one so asking only the two questions now. Shall ask the other one when I remember it.Emotion: smile

Sentence 1: "The author is editor of Newsweek magazine (or XYZ news media)".

My question 1: We often see the above sentence at the end of articles in newspapers or magazines when the author of the article happens to be an editor of news media. E.g. here http://to.ly/616P . What I never understood is that they never used the article "an" before the word editor! Why? Can you explain to me the logic of not using any article before the word editor?

Sentence 2: "He is PM of India" or "He is Gorbachev of China"

My question 2: Two questions on the sentence 2. If for some reason the article is not used before the word editor then should it not be the same case with the word PM? Why the articles "a" or "the" are used before the word PM when they are not used before the word editor? Should not the same happens with the word Gorbachev? Shouldn't it go without any article? Please answere these doubts. These articles are very problematic, really.Emotion: sad

Thanks and regards Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Mr Wordy"This could be a carrot to wave in front of the taxpayers" -- "carrot" (= inducement) is countable, but we don't mean any specific carrot, so we use "a".
"This was the Roman Empire of pre-Columbian America" -- "empire" is countable, and we're talking about a specific example, so we use "the".
"It was music to my ears" -- "music" is uncountable, so no article is needed.
Remember, though, that the use of articles can be highly idiomatic (non-rule-based). As soon as anyone formulates any kind of rule beyond the trivial, someone else generally comes up with a counterexample.
Thanks for giving so many examples, I'm understanding it slowly, but it could still take some time for me to understand it completly. Like in this example: "And amicus curaie Salve, a/the know baiter of him..." I used article "a" in my example because there are many baiters of him (person in question) but after some time of using article "a" I start getting confusion about its correctness because I've mentioned the name(Salve) already and I've been pointing to him. So should not the article "the" come there? I'm not sure because I'm confused about it. There are the situation which confuses me.

Apropos of Sanjeevani, I'm sorry I didn't realise you won't be able to get the adjectives borrowed from local mythologies. My bad, apology. I did try my best to explain it, though. It's used here very commonly. Google can shed some more light in it.
Razer Like in this example: "And amicus curaie Salve, a/the know baiter of him..." I used article "a" in my example because there are many baiters of him (person in question) but after some time of using article "a" I start getting confusion about its correctness because I've mentioned the name(Salve) already and I've been pointing to him. So should not the article "the" come there?
You mean "curiae". Your sentence doesn't make sense as written, and I'm guessing you mean "a/the known baiter of him". I assume "Salve" is someone's name. If Salve is one of many baiters, or if it's unknown whether there are any others, then you can use "a". However, you can also use "the" in these cases if the fact that there are (or may be) others is unimportant and Salve is the only one of interest in this context.
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Mr Wordy
Razer Like in this example: "And amicus curaie Salve, a/the know baiter of him..." I used article "a" in my example because there are many baiters of him (person in question) but after some time of using article "a" I start getting confusion about its correctness because I've mentioned the name(Salve) already and I've been pointing to him. So should not the article "the" come there?
You mean "curiae". Your sentence doesn't make sense as written, and I'm guessing you mean "a/the known baiter of him". I assume "Salve" is someone's name. If Salve is one of many baiters, or if it's unknown whether there are any others, then you can use "a".
Yes, did a typo, the correct word was "known".
Mr WordyHowever, you can also use "the" in these cases if the fact that there are (or may be) others is unimportant and Salve is the only one of interest in this context.
This is a very important and useful diffrence you told me. Thanks for that.