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Can we please go back to the Middle Ages where being fat and pale was considered beautiful?

Are there times where you should not help others the way they want?


To the best of my knowledge, they should be 'when'. Could it be that 'where' as well as 'when' is grammatical in the above two examples? If so, could you tell me the reason?


What is the name for the system where each branch of the US government can limit the actions of the other branches? (Answer: Checks and Balance)

I've been looking for a program where you type in something and the computer speaks it for you.


Could I use 'that' instead of 'where' in the above two examples?

Comments  
anonymousTo the best of my knowledge, they should be 'when'.

The first accommodates "where" better than the second. "Where" is often used loosely in this way. The first sentence refers to the Middle Ages as a world you can go to more than as a time. The second actually says "time" right out, so "where" is infelicitous. It is more a matter of idiom and sense than prescriptive grammar.

anonymousCould I use 'that' instead of 'where' in the above two examples?

Not at all. The first one could be "wherein" or "in which", which is what "where" really means here. I would avoid this use of "where" in formal writing.

The second is also informal (and poorly written). The workaround involves recasting: "I'm looking for a program that says aloud whatever you type in."

anonymousCan we please go back to the Middle Ages where being fat and pale was considered beautiful?Are there times where you should not help others the way they want?To the best of my knowledge, they should be 'when'. Could it be that 'where' as well as 'when' is grammatical in the above two examples? If so, could you tell me the reason?

I'd say that wh-relative clauses (with the relative where) are acceptable here. In my opinion, they anaphorically refer to the era (of the Middle Ages) and occasions respectively. It is not always the case that the where-relative clause suggests location like, for example, in: We have contests where winners win money and a day off from work.