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Do people really belong to nonconformist churches?

Not anymore. Now they're Free.

Scotland's nonconformist churches are colloquially known as the Wee Frees.

Odysseus
Do people really belong to nonconformist churches?

Not anymore. Now they're Free.

Scotland's nonconformist churches are colloquially known as the Wee Frees.

Odysseus
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Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or

Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or
http://tinyurl.com/yfoxf85
Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or

Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or

Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or

Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government ... of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian and Nonconformist Churches.

Do people really belong to nonconformist churches? What do they say? Oh, yes, I'm a member of the First Nonconformist Church of Squigley. Why don't you come some time? If later they start to conform, do they have to leave?

"Non-conformist" is a term used in BrE with a technical meaning.

OED:
nonconformist, n. and adj.
Originally (in the early 17th cent.): a person adhering to the doctrine but not the usages of the Church of England (now hist.). Later (esp. after the Act of Uniformity of 1662 and the consequent ejection from their livings of those ministers who refused to conform): a member of a Church which is separated from the Church of England; (in modern use, usually) a Protestant Dissenter.

In England the various Christian Churches are described as Church of England, Roman Catholic or Non-conformist.
There are no Churches with "Non-conformist" in the name. "Non-conformist" is just a way of referring to them on those few occasions when it is useful.
The non-conformist churches in England describe themselves as "free churches". There is more information on this website, include a list of memners of the Free Churches Group:
http://www.churches-together.net/Groups/42986/Churches Together in/About us Directories/Free Churches Group/Free Churches Group.aspx or

Note that this refers to England only. Terminology and organisations are different in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Ireland (North and South) the three categories were historically Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter. "Protestant" meant the Church of Ireland (Anglican and Episcopalian). Today the term "Protestant" is used in Ireland to mean "non-Catholic Christian".
4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or ... the system of government). Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Not anymore. Now they're Free.

Scotland's nonconformist churches are colloquially known as the Wee Frees.

Only one specific nonconformist Church in Scotalnd is known as the Wee Frees.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wee Frees
Readers beware!
What nonconformist Churches do not conform with is not the same in Scotland and in England.
In Scotland the "established" Church with which others do not conform is the Church of Scotland which is presbyterian. In England the "established" Church with which others no not conform is the Church of Enland which is episcopalian.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
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