I wonder if this sentence is correct:
"ministers want more competition in a sector they believe is too concentrated"

It sounds somehow weird to me even it may be correct. However, would this alternate form be correct ?

"ministers wnat more competition in a sector which they believe it is too concentrated"
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I wonder if this sentence is correct: "ministers want more competition in a sector they believe is too concentrated"

If arranged as a sentence (initial cap, period), Yes.
It sounds somehow weird to me even it may be correct. However, would this alternate form be correct ? "ministers want more competition in a sector which they believe it is too concentrated"

Same remark, but No. Subtract the "it" and it passes, but the original is better. If you feel the need, you can insert the elided "that" before "they".

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
http://owlcroft.com/english /
I wonder if this sentence is correct: "ministers want more competition in a sector they believe is too concentr=ated" It sounds somehow weird to me even it may be correct.

It is both correct and unclear. Which sector? Grocery stores? Banking? What
the "sector" might be is totally open.
However, would this alternate form be correct ? "ministers wnat more competition in a sector which they believe it is too=concentrated"

No.
GFH
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I wonder if this sentence is correct: "ministers want more competition in a sector they believe is too concentrated"

I believe this sentence needs a finisher (there is no full stop or period to end it) or more context to show what is "too concentrated.") Otherwise, without "where they believe it(see below)", I would like to see "congested." or "compressed." Those are complete in describing a sector, while "concentrated." needs a target or object, like "orange juice, effort, solution".
It sounds somehow weird to me even it may be correct. However, would this alternate form be correct ? "ministers wnat more competition in a sector which they believe it is too concentrated"

I would say "in a sector where they believe it ( the competition or whatever else the antecedent might be) is".
I wonder if this sentence is correct: "ministers want more competition in a sector they believe is too concentrated" It sounds somehow weird to me even it may be correct.

You have omitted a word beween even and it. Probably "if".
However, would this alternate form be correct ? "ministers wnat more competition in a sector which they believe it is too concentrated"

But here you have added a word that shouldn't be there, "it". Sidely sounds very British, but this seems like a common mistake for those whose native language is Spanish, or maybe any Latin language. Or any language that wouldn't use an article like "it" where English does. Maybe a language which woudln't use "it" at all in "it is too concentrated"**, so in English, people aren't sure when to use it and when not to.
**"Es muy concentrado", iirc. No "it". So it's hard to have a feel for when "it" is needed and when it's not. Here the word "sector" is already there, and it sort of fills the role of "it".

To see what is correct, rephrase this way, "The ministers believe the sector is too concentrated." Not "The ministers believe the sector it is too comcentrated."
Despite Eric's post, I don't see why "which" is better than "that", although neither is necessary here. There normally is a relative pronoun connecting an adjectival clause to the word it modifies, but here it can be omitted with no confusion and usually is. It flows more nicely without the word which or that.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
Thanks all,
The sentence may seem unclear because taken out of the context, which is about banking industry in Britain. All of you are stating that the fist sentence is correct, I get it. I was just bewildered by this sentence with 2 embedding clauses.
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Thanks all,
The sentence may seem unclear because taken out of the context, which is about banking industry in Britain. All of you are stating that the fist sentence is correct, I get it. I was just bewildered by this sentence with 2 embedding clauses.
Thanks all, The sentence may seem unclear because taken out of the context, which is =about banking industry in Britain. All of you are stating that the fist sentence is correct, I get it. I was=just bewildered by this sentence with 2 embedding clauses.

Very unclear. I thought that "ministers" preached religion from the pulpit. Oh, perhaps politicians do also. Bow down to mother earth and worship global warming.
GFH
Thanks all, The sentence may seem unclear because taken out ... was just bewildered by this sentence with 2 embedding clauses.

Very unclear. I thought that "ministers" preached religion from the pulpit. Oh, perhaps politicians do also. Bow down to mother earth and worship global warming.

Some ministers preach. Other ministers are members of a government (AmE: executive branch).
From the COED:
http://www.askoxford.com/concise oed/minister?view=uk

noun

1 a head of a government department.
2 a diplomatic agent, usually ranking below an ambassador,representing a state or sovereign in a foreign country.
3 a member of the clergy, especially in the Presbyterian andNonconformist Churches.

4 archaic, a person or thing used to achieve or convey something:ministers of death.
verb

1 (minister to) attend to the needs of.
2 archaic, provide.

ORIGIN Latin, 'servant', from minus 'less'.
The relevant menaings are 2 and 1.
2: a member of the clergy is a servant of God.
1: a head of a government department is a servant of the Monarch, President or People (depending on the system of government).

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
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