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The complaints, some which were made yesterday, were ridiculous.

Is this above OK?

Is this short for, some of which were made yesterday?

Thanks
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English 1b3Is this short for, some of which were made yesterday?
No, it's incorrect for some of which were made yesterday.

CB
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Hi CB,

May I ask why?

Thanks
English 1b3Is this short for, some of which were made yesterday?
Is WHAT short for "some of which were made yesterday" ??

- A. Emotion: thinking

Edit. Sorry, my eyes must be blurring.
Sorry, the original wording=this

some which were made yesterday.
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(You must have been resting up for this one.)

I'd rather let CB answer. I hope I didn't dispatch him.

Oh, well. In my opinion, with or without the "[of] which," "some were made yesterday" is more parenthetical to "the complaints" than it is in apposition to it.

The cars (some were blue) went roaring past.

I know that's not your question, but I think it's relevant.
Come back, CB. You're just about to break five grand! Emotion: beerEmotion: beerEmotion: beerEmotion: beerEmotion: beer
Avangi, well. In my opinion, with or without the "[of] which," "some were made yesterday" is more parenthetical to "the complaints" than it is in apposition to it.

I wouldn't say it is in apposition to...I hope that's not what you thought I said. I agree it's parenthetical, a parenthetical adjective/relative clause. But seeing as there is no finite verb in the original, I presume the clause has been truncated into a phrase, similar to the following examples:

I looked down at the buildings, some (of which were) destroyed, some (of which were) still standing.

I saw a group, two (of whom) were sitting on the floor.

What do ya think?
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No, I didn't think you were saying they were appositives, but I thought you might be thinking so.

Only the verbs are necessary to make the phrases into clauses. Why muddle it up with "of which/whom" ?

Sure, "of which/whom" clarifies the parenthetical relationship, but why does a "parenthetical expression" need to be a clause?

Edit. Okay, I'll admit that if you add the "of whom/which," you must also add the verb.
So you can have both, neither, or the verb.
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