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I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one of whom had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver.

I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one who had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver.

Which is better? Both correct?
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Comments  
English 1b3,

You questions seem to be involved with dependent and independent clauses, as well as punctuations.

I picked this one as the correct answer. Also the following link will help you clear up some, if not all, your questions.
English 1b3I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one of whom had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver.

This is a part of exerpt from: http://legacy.somerset.kctcs.edu/pdf/Run-on%20sentences.pdf

How to fix comma splices, fused sentences

and run-ons.

You can separate the clauses with a period.

You can join the clause s with a semi-colon.

I don't think you understand my questions, sorry. My questions are not regarding comma splices, nor run-ons, nor fused sentences. Both my sentences don't have these problems.

My question is more concerned with absolute constructions and relative clauses with quantifiers if you want to speak using terminology.

I thank you for time, but I may just wait for someone with a little more knowledge in the subject area. Sorry, I do not mean to offend.
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I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one of whom had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver. OK

I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one who had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver. Not OK. In this one there's no relative pronoun that connects back to friends -- just who, which connects back to one. The result of this mistake is that the second part of the sentence is just a dangling fragment of a sentence.

CJ
Not OK. In this one there's no relative pronoun that connects back to friends -- just who, which connects back to one. The result of this mistake is that the second part of the sentence is just a dangling fragment of a sentence.

This was my initial thought, but couldn't one argue that it is a summative modifier, one that sums up what has been said using a noun phrase and continues with a relative clause?

Just like the summative modifier in bold.

Sorry to push all this silly terminology your way. If you still disregard the structure, I will disregard the term myself.

English 1b3couldn't one argue that it is a summative modifier?
No, because it isn't a summative modifier. You are not re-explaining or redefining Mum's friends or scary stories; you are adding new information. Besides, a summative modifier at that point in the sentence would have to be plural to go with friends or with stories, and you have one.

*I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, one who had a cousin murdered for speaking rudely to a taxi driver.

To put a summative modifier in that sentence, you would need something really different -- something like these:

I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, crazy people she has "collected" over the years.
I've heard some scary stories from Mum's friends, tales ranging from fistfights to petty revenge murders.

CJ

PS. Does your grammar source really insist that a summative modifier include a relative clause? That doesn't seem necessary.
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PS. Does your grammar source really insist that a summative modifier include a relative clause? That doesn't seem necessary.

The varous definitions I have read say it is modified, which can only be a relative clause (or an appositive) can't it, since it is modifying a noun phrase?

Or are you suggesting it doesn't need to be followed by anything?
For someone who is looking for help, you certainly have an attitude my friend!

No problem. Sorry that I ever even started, whew!
No attitude at all. Simply asking for help. Admitting i know little. Never claiming I know a lot, nor that I'm right and someone else is wrong. Sorry you inferred my posts incorrectly.
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