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It's a story about a young girl who gets obused by her Step Father, and who runs away from home.

It's a story about a young girl who gets obused by her Step Father, and runs away from home.

But I want to write it so that it is clear that she runs away because of the abuse, so I need to use 'so' not 'and'. Is this below ok?

It's a story about a young girl, who gets obused by her Step Father, so who runs away from home.

I'd prefer to keep it as two relative clauses and not "so she runs away"

Thanks

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I see no need to keep the second relative clause:

It's a story about a young girl who is abused by her stepfather and [therefore] runs away from home.

I think the cause and effect relationship is clear, even without the extra 'therefore'.
Comments  
Apologies for presenting a ungrammatical sentence. Not my own work, but I should've corrected it myself.

I asked this question because I thought surely we could join two predicates (or two relative clauses) by so.

It's a story about a young girl who is abused by her stepfather, so (who) runs away from home.

I admit it doesn't sound all to good, but it just seems wrong to say we can't show such a relationship. So you claim the above is incorrect, with or without 'who'?