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Are the below acceptable in either U.S or U.K. English?
1. The Beatles is a group who is loved by many people all over the world.
2. The Beatles is a group who are loved by many people all over the world.
3. The Beatles are a group who are loved by many people all over the world.

4. The Beatles was a group who was loved by many people all over the world.
5. The Beatles was a group who were loved by many people all over the world.
6. The Beatles were a group who were loved by many people all over the world.

Can you use present tense or past tense for this example? Cheers Fulvio
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Because the name of the group is so obviously plural, I find only #3 and #6 natural-sounding. Either tense is possible, but it will depend on how the Beatles are being viewed in the greater context—as a defunct group or as one that still has many CDs on the market.
Comments  
I'd use past tense because two members of the group (Lennon/Harrison) are deceased, and in any case the group had been inactive for many years prior to their deaths. But if you're talking about their music today, you would probably say "these Beatles' recordings are (not were) very enjoyable

Generally with indisputable collective nouns (like "committee", "jury", "board" etc.), if they occur in the singular as head of the subject noun phrase the verb can, especially in BrE, be singular or plural, though AmE favours the singular. But "The Beatles" is a plural proper name and though it's the name of the group as a whole, we also see it as referring to the individual members: we tend to think of John, George, Paul and Ringo as each being a Beatle. For subject-verb agreement purposes, when we talk of several individuals it's normal to use a plural verb.

A useful test is to compare sentences in the present tense: "The Beatles, who have made many recordings, are from Liverpool" vs the awful-sounding "The Beatles who has made many recordings is from Liverpool". So, plural verb it is:

"The Beatles were a group who were loved...

BillJ