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Hi,

This is just a hypothetical situation. Let's say that the area where I live is plaqued with frequent fires in the warmer months of the year and that a friend of mine is a volunteer firefighter who helps put the fires out. The problem is that it pulls his focus from school because he's constantly in the field. Could I use the word 'relief' if I was talking about the school and how he should be eligible for different tratment than the rest of the students?

"The school should give him relief from some of the workload."

Thank you.

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Ann225The school should give him relief from some of the workload.

Fine.

Another phrasing that occurred to me was this:

The school should ease up on his workload.

CJ

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This is just a hypothetical situation. Let's say that the area where I live is plaqued plagued with frequent fires in the warmer months of the year and that a friend of mine is a volunteer firefighter who helps put the fires out. The problem is that it pulls his focus from volunter job.school because he's constantly in the field. Could I use the word 'relief' if I was talking about the school and how he should be eligible for different tratment than the rest of the students?

You could say eg "The school should make some kind of special allowance because of his community work'

Clive

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That’s the one I came up with as well! Thank you.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thanks for the correction. I didn’t notice that I’d accidentally typed ‘q’ instead of ‘g’. They look so similar. I’m sorry for that.