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There is in English the following verbal form: verb + verb ending in ing:
I remember doing something = I did it and now I remember this.
I regret saying what I said = I said what I said and I’m sorry about it.

Examples (I’ve put my translations into Spanish in order Spanish speakers, particularly, can help me):
I remember driving along this road sometime. (Yo recuerdo haber manejado por esta carretera alguna vez)
I regret doing what I did. (Yo lamento haber hecho lo que hice)

Now, my doubts:
1.- In English, you can say: : “She admits having stolen the money = She admits stealing the money”. Then, can I say: “I remember having driven along this road sometime”; “I regret having done what I did”?
2.- Are there in English other verbs to which I can apply the rule (verb+verb ending in ing)? For example:
a) I believe meeting someone with this name. (Creo haber conocido a alguien con ese nombre). Is this the same as “I believe having met someone with this name”?
b) I guess answering to all your questions. (Supongo haber respondido a todas tus preguntas). Is this the same as “I guess having answered to all your questions”?
c) She said having that book in her library. (Ella dijo haber tenido ese libro en su biblioteca). Is this the same as “She said having had that book in her library”?
3.- If there are in English other verbs to which I can apply this rule (BUT with the same meaning as I wrote in Spanish, that is, haber tenido, haber hecho, haber dicho,…,etc) could you give me as more examples as you can? Please, take into account that I’m not answering about such constructions like: “Please, stop talking”; “Paul like cooking”; “He goes on talking”; and so on. Maybe CalifJim and paco can understand me better because they can speak Spanish, but I expect answers from anyone.
And thank you in advance.
Eladio
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Hello Eladio

It's been almost forty years since friends from Spain taught me Spanish. Now I forgot almost all of your language. Puedo apprender espanol solamente pocissimo. I think I'm not a right person for explaining the relation between English gerundive phrases and Spanish verbo+infinitivo constructs. Therefore, you'd better expect it from CJ. Here I'd ike to tell you only what I know.

As you know well, many English verbs can take a gerund (v-ing) as their object. Those verbs can be grouped according to the characteristics in their usage and meaning. One of the groups (I call it as "admit group") comprises: "admit"/ "be ashamed of"/ "deny"/ "forget"/ "recall"/ "recollect"/ "regret"/ "remember". The "admit" group of verbs are used to express some state of the subject's mind or brainwork about the past event, which is expressed by the following 'v-ing'. As you already know, this group of verbs can be used this way;
(1a) Can't remember having told me the story last week?
(1b) She regrets having wasted money on such junk.
(1c) He was ashamed of having asked such a silly question.
(1d) The guy denied having stolen the money.
However, you can use a simple 'v-ing' instead of the construct 'having + v-ed', because these verbs are to express almost always a past event when they are combined with a 'v-ing'.
(2a) Can't you remember telling me the story last week?
(2b) She regrets wasting money on such junk.
(2c) He was ashamed of asking such a silly question.
(2d) The girl denied stealing the money.
(1a), (1b), (1c) and (1d) might not be wrong but (2a), (2b), (2c) and (2d) would sound more natural as English collocations.

As for a verb belonging to the admit group, its construct of can be paraphrased into a construct of .
(3a) Can't you remember (that) you told me the story last week?
(3b) She regrets (that) she wasted money on such junk.
(3c) He was ashamed that he had asked such a silly question.
(3d) The girl denied (that) she had stolen the money.

But the reverse is not always true. For example, those verbs you mentioned, i.e., "believe", "guess", and "say" can take a construct of , but they cannot take the construct of
(o) I believe (that) I have met someone with this name.
(x) I believe meeting someone with this name.
(o) I guess (that) I have answered to all your questions.
(x) I guess answering to all your questions.
(o) She said (that) she had that book in her library.
(x) She said having that book in her library.
This may be one of the usage differences between English and Spanish verbs even though they are equivalent in the meaning.

Some English verbs that can take the construct of are as follows;
(1) appreciate/ enjoy/ consider/ fancy/ imagine/ practice/ risk/ understand/
(2) admit/ deny/ ***/ recall/ recollect/ ***/ remember
(3) avoid/ can't help/ escape/ evade/ miss/ resist/ mind/
(4) ***/ ***/ delay/ give up/ finish/ leave off/ postpone/ put off/ start(*)/ stop/
(5) advise/ allow/ permit/ prohibit/ recommend/ suggest
(6) ***/ ***/ ***/ ***/ ***
(7) ***/ ***/ ***/ ***/ ***/ ***/
(8) ***/ ***/ ***/ ***/
(9) ***/ ***/ ***/
The mark * implies that the verb so marked can take also a construct of .

Hope this will help you a little.

paco
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you, paco. You always post large explanations and I appreciate that too much. I though your native language was Spanish, as you sign "paco", because "Paco" is the nickname of Francisco (a Spanish name) in Spanish, and I though that too because you sign with "La vida es sueño, y los sueños, sueños son", which is a verse by Calderon de la Barca I believe.
Now, could you agree more verbs to your "admit group" in order I can learn all of them?
Anyway I'll appreciate if CalifJim could help me. And thanks again!
Eladio
Hello Eladio

I'd like to believe I listed up almost all the verbs of "admit group" which you would use in everyday speech.

I also hope CJ will answer to your question.

paco