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"He observes that that which each person regards as good is that which appears so to himself, and that which appears good to each person is not so by nature".

It seems to me that I should add another "that" after ", and". Is this right?
Comments  
Hi,

"He observes that that which each person regards as good is that which appears so to himself, and that which appears good to each person is not so by nature".

It seems to me that I should add another "that" after ", and". Is this right? I wouldn't say 'should'. You could, but I wouldn't.

Clive
Mmm, I feel that the main verb requires another "that" to show that the second clause depends on it.
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Sextus,

In all due respect, let's examine these structually-similar-to-yours sentences and see if what Clive said makes sense.

1. He thought it is good. No need for the word that here, I am sure.

2. He thought the bird that flew over the electrical line is the bird that he saw the day before.

No need for the word "that" here too, I am pretty sure.

SO, in your case, one "the" can be optional (I am pretty sure).
Sextus"He observes that that which each person regards as good is that which appears so to himself, and that which appears good to each person is not so by nature".

It seems to me that I should add another "that" after ", and". Is this right?

"He observes that what (=that which) each person regards as good is what (that which) appears so to himself, and that what (=that which) appears good to each person is not so by nature".

As seen above, if 'that which' is changed to 'what' for clarity, one clearly sees the need to add another 'that' after 'and'.
Pinenut, it seems to me that your argument clearly proves what I said. But then, does it sound ok if I say "that that which .... that that which" ?
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Reminds me of the puzzle: use that that that that that in a sentence

Answer: He said that that 'that' that that man used was wrong.
SextusPinenut, it seems to me that your argument clearly proves what I said. But then, does it sound ok if I say "that that which .... that that which" ?

Anything is possible, but if you want to be a good writer or communicator, you ought to ovoid awkward syntactical construction.

The 'that which' phrase can be easily replaced with a better word or phrase as I did with 'what'.
I'd agree that the second "that" isn't necessary; you can analyse your present structure as:


He observes that:

a) that which each person regards as good is that which appears so to himself, and

b) that which appears good to each person is not so by nature.
(And I'd also agree that "what" is probably better here!)

MrP
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