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As a case in point, the European single currency has bluntly highlighted price differentials between translators in various EU countries, with the effect that pressure is put on those in the more prosperous parts of the Union to reduce their prices. Strangely enough, this never works the other way round, with the people in the ‘cheaper’ countries being paid more in line with what people get in ‘more expensive’ countries. "

hi what does the overall meaning of this text? I know its too long ! Sorry and thank you
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It means that translators in Germany, France, Great Britain (those from the richer countries) earn more money than those from the poorer ones (like Bulgaria, Romania, Lithuania) for doing the same job.

Yes, but it goes on to say that people argue that the better-paid translators should earn less. They never argue that lower-paid translators should earn more.

Clive
Comments  
It means that translators in Germany, France, Great Britain (those from the richer countries) earn more money than those from the poorer ones (like Bulgaria, Romania, Lithuania) for doing the same job.
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

Hey there, I've been thinking about it and here is what I did with the help of paraphrasing tool :

As a for example, the European single cash has obtusely featured value differentials between interpreters in different EU nations, with the impact that weight is put on those in the more prosperous parts of the Union to diminish their costs. For some odd reason, this never works the other path round, with the general population in the 'less expensive' nations being paid more in accordance with what individuals get in 'more costly' nations.