Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure' or Yeah I am talking to you'. What sense should you make of 1. sure and 2. Yeah I am talking to you? In other words, what are the definitions of the 'sure' and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context in question?

Are'nt they a *** way of speaking?
1 2
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure' or ... and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context in question? Are'nt they a *** way of speaking?

Not a native speaker of English, but I'd hazard a guess that sure might be "you're welcome" in a very casual, informal way. I have no idea about the other one.
What do you mean by the *** way of speaking?
I haven't had a chance to hear any *** speaking so far.

qt
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure' or ... 1. sure and 2. Yeah I am talking to you? In other words, what are the definitions of the 'sure'

You're welcome.
and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context in question?

Never heard that one.
Are'nt they a *** way of speaking?

Yes, IMO.

I filter all messages from google groups.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure'

Sure is a less formal version of "You're welcome".

In a way it is more gracious than you're welcome. It means of course he would do for you whatever he did. Either he considered it very little, and you are not indebted to him for what he did; or it was clearly some effort, he likes you enough or considers the two of you close enough that of course he would do it for you.

I really don't know what "You're welcome" means when people say it now. It was gracious originally, in the same way that "Sure" is, but now it is a platitude and I don't know how many people are in touch with its meaning.
or Yeah I am talking to you'.

If he says this, you should get on your Harley and get out of there quick. At the very least you should get your hands off his girl friend.
What sense should you make of 1. sure and 2. Yeah I am talking to you? In other words, what ... and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context in question? Are'nt they a *** way of speaking?

I don't know what that means. But it sounds harsh for the first one, Sure, which is a nice, pleasant, normal way of speaking.
Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure'

Sure is a less formal version of "You're welcome". In a way it is more gracious than you're welcome. It ... likes you enough or considers the two of you close enough that of course he would do it for you.

I see. Many thanks.
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulne=ss, and then he replies, 'Sure' or ... and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context =A0in question? Are'nt they a *** =A0way of speaking?

I'm a native speaker of English, U.S. version, and I've never heard the second reply to a thank you. It sounds weird and meaningless. Could you give us the context in which you heard or read it?

"I'm talking to you" is generally said in a threatening way by someone in authority, parent to child or police to miscreant, demanding attention, obedience or action.
Paul
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure' or ... and the 'Yeah I am talking to you' in the context in question? Are'nt they a *** way of speaking?

I'm a native speaker of English, U.S. version, and I've never heard the second reply to a thank you. It sounds weird and meaningless. Could you give us the context in which you heard or read it?

Sorry. It seems difficult for me to give the context, which will reveal the identity of a person who is sure to remain anonymous in this connection.
"I'm talking to you" is generally said in a threatening way by someone in authority, parent to child or police to miscreant, demanding attention, obedience or action.
Many thanks.
Paul
Suppose someone did you some favor and you say to him words of thankfulness, and then he replies, 'Sure'

Sure is a less formal version of "You're welcome". In a way it is more gracious than you're welcome. It ... is, but now it is a platitude and I don't know how many people are in touch with its meaning.

This is a wild guess. It might have come from 'You are welcome to benefit from the benefit I have given you' or 'I like you for whatever you have asked'?
"I'm talking to you" is generally said in a threatening way by someone in authority, parent to child or police to miscreant, demanding attention, obedience or action.

Or by a belligerent drunk, responding to a questioning or confused reaction from the person he's just gratuitously insulted. (IME anyway.)

Odysseus
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more