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I will reply your email soon.

I will reply to your email soon.

Which one is corerct?

Thanks
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thanks for the reference!
Personally, I'm not sure I trust The Right Word at the Right Time on this issue.

I will reply your email soon is something I've never seen or heard in the U.S.!

The only example in my American Heritage Dictionary with reply as a transitive verb is with a that clause as the object, as in He replied that he could not attend the conference.

CJ
CalifJimThanks for the reference!
Personally, I'm not sure I trust The Right Word at the Right Time on this issue.

I will reply your email soon is something I've never seen or heard in the U.S.!

The only example in my American Heritage Dictionary with reply as a transitive verb is with a that clause as the object, as in He replied that he could not attend the conference.

CJ

The Right Word at the Right Time is not the only book that says what I quoted. There are one or two other books that say the same thing.
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Hi,

I will reply your email soon. This sounds very odd and wrong to me, too.

Clive
In standard AmE you can say I wrote my mother where British usage would require I wrote to my mother. (Longman Guide to English Usage)
The right answer is reply to.
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The case with wrote rings true, but I would analyze this sentence differently from the sentence with reply.

The verb write takes a direct and an indirect object, e.g., letter, my mother. It can occur in two structures.

I wrote a letter to my mother. [Both AmE and BrE.]
I wrote my mother a letter. [Both AmE and BrE.]

American practice allows the direct object to be dropped in either structure (but only for the verb write -- not generally for all such verbs).

I wrote to my mother.
I wrote my mother.

[In case you're interested, the second of these would not be my preference. I recognize the pattern only passively.]

British practice only allows this D.O.-dropping in the first of the two.

I wrote to my mother.
_______

The verb reply does not take two objects in either the American or the British usage, so there is nothing analogous in the structures. It's hard to see how the email can be an indirect object in either usage since it's inanimate. The claim that reply the email is accepted in AmE is therefore, I suppose, a claim that the email is a direct object. But since direct objects are usually acted upon by the verb (lift the book, write the letter, take the money), it's hard to see how it's possible for the email to be a direct object. That is, it's hard to see how the action of replying can affect or act upon email received. If this pattern is really being used, it's certainly a novel development in English! (Or the usage of outsourced employees from other countries trying their best to write English in emails originating in U.S. companies.)

CJ