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Hi ... I´m reporting the following issues. Could you please give me your opinion:

1.1) He was not aware of how the client´s requirements could be accessed through the extranet.
OR should I say 1.2) He was not aware of how to access the client´s requirements through the extranet

2.1) During the visit, it was shown how to access it.
OR should I say 2.2) During the visit, it was shown how the extranet could be accessed.

3.1) It was highlighted the need for the new starters to review the company´s procedures OR should I say 3.1) It was highlighted the need for the new starters for reviewing the company´s procedures.

I would appreciate if you could help me.
Thanks,
Ritinha
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1.1) He was not aware of how the client´s requirements could be accessed through the extranet.

OR should I say

1.2) He was not aware of how to access the client´s requirements through the extranet

JT: Either is okay.

2.1) During the visit, the client [it] was shown how to access it.
OR should I say 2.2) During the visit, the client [it] was shown how the extranet could be accessed.

JT: I'm not sure why you want to use the subject 'it', Ritinha.

3.1) It was highlighted the need for the new starters to review the company´s procedures OR should I say 3.1) It was highlighted the need for the new starters for reviewing the company´s procedures.

JT: I'm not sure what it is that you're trying to say;

The need for the new starters to review the company´s procedures was highlighted.
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Hello Ritinha

Just in case Just the Truth forgets, here are my suggestions:

1. He didn't know how to access the client's requirements through the extranet.

2. During the visit, training was given in how to access the extranet.

3. The need for new staff to review company procedures was highlighted.

(If on the other hand Just the Truth doesn't forget, you'll have two sets of suggestions.)

I've changed 'new starters' to 'new staff', to avoid tautology.

MrP
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Comments  
Thanks JT ... just to clarify:

in 2.1 "it" does not refer to the client; I want to say that during the visit, it was shown to the person who did not know how to access the extranet, the way of accessing it.
But according to your suggestion, I will be changing to:
During the visit, Person X was shown how to access the extranet.

in 3.1 I´m trying to say that the new starters must review the company´s procedures ... but I would like to refer as a need ... I mean, it is sth important (reason why I´ve used the expression 'highlighted´) that needs to be done.

Ritinha
in 2.1 "it" does not refer to the client; I want to say that during the visit, it was shown to the person who did not know how to access the extranet, the way of accessing it.
But according to your suggestion, I will be changing to:
During the visit, Person X was shown how to access the extranet.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

I understand that [it] didn't refer to a person; I only left it there in brackets to show it had been replaced.

Mu point is that without a prior reference, 'it' sounds a bit funny. It's better to use a subject and explain what was shown to that person.

{Class time, gotta run. I'll try to explain further later, IF I don't forget}
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 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.