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Hi there.

We were discussing reported speech at one of my school lessons and 'special words' connected with it.
You know, words like today would get changed into that day, yesterday to the day before, and so on...

And then my teacher mentioned reporting the previous day. And that it transforms into the following day. I don't really see how can previous be changed into following... I asked other teachers as well, and their response to that was either that they didn't know, or that previous day can't be really used in direct speech, or that if it is, it does not change. However, none of my teachers are native speakers, so I would like to know your opinion Emotion: smile What's right?

Thanks in advance. Emotion: smile
Comments  
LittleMissKateAnd then my teacher mentioned reporting the previous day. And that it transforms into the following day.
Are you sure your teacher said that? It doesn't sound right. Can you give an example?

CJ
I'm pretty sure he did. I was arguing with him about it.

He didn't mention any example though, he just said that the previous day changes into the following day, which I thought was not right at all.
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You're probably right. I can't think of a situation where you would report "previous" as "following".

CJ
And could I ask how would you report it in general? Or would previous remain unchanged?
Unchanged.

Karen said, "I saw him on the previous day".
Karen said (that) she had seen him on the previous day.

CJ
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Thank you so much. Emotion: smile