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Hi guys, just a point I'd like to clarify which was brought up at a seminar I attended regarding the drafting of legal documents.

From my understanding, I've always thought that when a "request" (used as a verb) is made for an object, the sentence should be in the form "request + for + object", i.e., "request" must be followed by the preposition "for".

Take for example:

(1) "He requested for a form."
=> Where "form" = object
OR
(2) "He requested for a speedy resolution of the matter."
=> "speedy resolution of the matter" = object
OR
(3) "He requested for an extension of the deadline."
=> "extension of the deadline" = object
=> Conversely, you could take "extension" as the object and "of the deadline" as a modifier/adjunct. Likewise for example (2)

It is only in the case of sub-clauses that the preposition "for" is omitted, such as:

(4) "He requested that immediate action be taken"
==> "that immediate action be taken" = subordinate clause, where the verb in the main clause is "requested".

The problem is at the seminar I attended, I was told that the following sentence is WRONG: "He requested for an adjournment".

According to the lecturer, "for" should be omitted, such that the correct sentence should read: "He requested an adjournment".

Now it's pretty clear to me that "an adjournment" is a noun acting as the object in this clause, so why do we drop the "for"? Did the lecturer make a mistake? Or have I been completely off-track all along? In this case, "He requested an adjournment" actually sounds fine to me, but not when I apply this same rule to the example (2) or (3) above:

"He requested a speedy resolution of the matter."

> Sounds odd.
"He requested an extension of the deadline".

> Sounds odd.

I've been repeating example (1) over and over again so I can't even tell which version (with or without the "for") sounds more correct anymore!

Help anyone?
Comments  
To me, all your examples with 'for' sound very odd indeed.

The only time I would use 'for' with request would be as follows:

He made a request for a form. (otherwise 'he requested a form' without any 'for').

He made a request for an extension to the deadline (otherwise 'He requested an extension of the deadline').

So when 'request' is a noun it is used with 'for' but when it is a verb it is used without.
Hi,

From my understanding, I've always thought that when a "request" (used as a verb) is made for an object, the sentence should be in the form "request + for + object", i.e., "request" must be followed by the preposition "for".

'Request' is a transitive verb. No 'for' should be used. eg 'He requested a form'. Perhaps you are being misled by the noun 'request', where you would use 'for', eg 'He made a request for a form'.

The problem is at the seminar I attended, I was told that the following sentence is WRONG: "He requested for an adjournment". Drefinitely wrong

Did the lecturer make a mistake? No


"He requested a speedy resolution of the matter." ==> Sounds odd. No, it's correct
"He requested an extension of the deadline". ==> Sounds odd. No, it's correct


Best wishes, Clive
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AnonymousHi guys, just a point I'd like to clarify which was brought up at a seminar I attended regarding the drafting of legal documents.

From my understanding, I've always thought that when a "request" (used as a verb) is made for an object, the sentence should be in the form "request + for + object", i.e., "request" must be followed by the preposition "for".

Take for example:

(1) "He requested for a form."
=> Where "form" = object
OR
(2) "He requested for a speedy resolution of the matter."
=> "speedy resolution of the matter" = object
OR
(3) "He requested for an extension of the deadline."
=> "extension of the deadline" = object
=> Conversely, you could take "extension" as the object and "of the deadline" as a modifier/adjunct. Likewise for example (2)

It is only in the case of sub-clauses that the preposition "for" is omitted, such as:

(4) "He requested that immediate action be taken"
==> "that immediate action be taken" = subordinate clause, where the verb in the main clause is "requested".

The problem is at the seminar I attended, I was told that the following sentence is WRONG: "He requested for an adjournment".

According to the lecturer, "for" should be omitted, such that the correct sentence should read: "He requested an adjournment".

Now it's pretty clear to me that "an adjournment" is a noun acting as the object in this clause, so why do we drop the "for"? Did the lecturer make a mistake? Or have I been completely off-track all along? In this case, "He requested an adjournment" actually sounds fine to me, but not when I apply this same rule to the example (2) or (3) above:

"He requested a speedy resolution of the matter."

> Sounds odd.
"He requested an extension of the deadline".

> Sounds odd.

I've been repeating example (1) over and over again so I can't even tell which version (with or without the "for") sounds more correct anymore!

Help anyone?

Hi Anon,

My understanding with the word “request” is this. When we used [request] as a verb, it’s most likely in a subjunctive condition, i.e. “The HR manager over the phone requested that I submit a formal application for employment before the actual interview”.

John requested that everyone in the office come to his birthday party.

When [request] is used as a noun, the verb [made] is used along with it. Example:

John told me that he had made several requests to transfer out of his office in LA but received no answers.

Several requests [for ] / [to have] a new vending machine have been made by the employees but so far no response from the management.

Hi,

BTW, [request for], depending on the context, it's possibly correct. Google result: 2,100,000,000 for request

I think you need to be careful how you google on this matter. You need to do it in such a way that you get only the verb form. eg search for 'requested' versus 'requested for'.

There's really no doubt on the general structure. You request a beer. You don't request for a beer.

Best wishes, Clive
Or have I been completely off-track all along?
I'm sorry to say that there is no really charitable way to phrase this.
Yes. Emotion: indifferent

The confusion seems to be between the verb and noun usage of request.

to request something = to make a request for something

Don't cry yourself to sleep over it. You'll get the hang of it before long. Emotion: smile

CJ
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Thanks for all the input guys!! I was indeed confused over the noun and verb usage of "request". What an ass I've been!! Emotion: embarrassed
Don't feel embarassed about it. I'm sure your English gets better and better all the time. No-one is perfect.
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