+0


The sentence below is from an exam held nationwide in Turkey in 2005. The answer is A, but why "imply" is wrong? doesn't it have a sense meaning require?

Marathon-training schedules range from four to six months and they all ---- considerable

discipline.

A) require B) reduce C) imply D) combine E) improve
1 2 3
Comments  
Hi,

The sentence below is from an exam held nationwide in Turkey in 2005. The answer is A, but why "imply" is wrong? doesn't it have a sense meaning require?

Marathon-training schedules range from four to six months and they all ---- considerable

discipline.


A) require B) reduce C) imply D) combine E) improve

'Require' results in a simple, easy to see meaning. I wouldn't say 'imply' is unacceptable, but it requires a lot more effort to find a meaning. What you'd be saying, in a long version, would be

Marathon-training schedules range from four to six months and, because they are demanding, they all imply that anyone who follows such a schedule must be a person who has considerable discipline.

Best wishes, Clive

how can I explain why a test-taker shouldn't go for it?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi,

how can I explain why a test-marker shouldn't go for it? Easy. eg -

They live in a black and white world where only one answer is right. (As you can see, I live in a blue world)

They are not testing your knowledge of subtleties.

Perhaps they don't know, themselves.

The person who marks the test does not even have to speak English. A computer could mark such a test.

Don't get frustrated, tests are just tests. Just go for the obvious answer.

Best wishes, Clive

I think I was misunderstood. Let's say I am preparing a book for an exam. For this question "imply" is the best distractor. And I should explain why they (takers of the exam) should choose "require" and not "imply". just saying the most suitable alternative would be "require" wouldn't qualify for an answer, would it? can you help me?
Hi,

Oh, I see what you are doing.

Well, why don't you just choose another word than 'imply', a word where there is no doubt at all that it is wrong?

Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I was misunderstood again. Clive, I am not preparing a question. This question was asked in an exam held nationwide in 1990 in Turkey. I didn't prepare this question. The exam board did. But what I am doing now is to prepare a book providing explanatory answers to the board's questions. now how can I explain in the book why "require" is correct but "imply" is not? how can I? just saying the most suitable alternative would be "require" wouldn't qualify for an answer, would it? can you help me?
Dear Diamondrg
To "require" means that something is necessary or demanded. e.g. "Training to be a doctor requires a lot of hard work." (Cambridge Learners Dictionary)
To "imply" is quite different. It means to suggest or show something, without saying it directly. e.g. "Are you implying that I am fat?" (Cambridge Learners Dictionary)

The exam question you have posed and the required answer (i.e. require) would be quite clear and obvious to a native English speaker. Your enquiry implies that you may need to more research and study on the subject! (Please do not be offended! I'm only using the target words as examples of their respective uses. No personal offence intended!)

I hope this helps you.
With all good wishes...

Regards
,then you must be a native speaker. if so, why do you need Cambridge definitions? and why should I be offended?

LONGMAN DEFINITON:

-if a principle, action, idea etc implies something, it makes other actions or conditions necessary: Democracy implies a respect for individual liberties.

To me, here "imply" is a sysnonym for "require", and I will insist on it until a native speaker tells me that it is not.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more