Hello everyone, the writing below is my research paper for this term. I looked through it once but my problem is not being able to see my own mistakes. Emotion: tongue tied I will really appreciate your help if you can give me hints to turn the language into formal British English and find grammatical mistakes. Thanks in advance.

INTRODUCTION

Capital punishment-executing of criminals, has been done all over the world, regardless of age, sex and nationality in different ways such as by using guillotine, hanging, injection, gases or electro shock. The only aim to do this was to hinder similar crimes, even some countries preferred to show execution to people to give a lesson to them and to make an unforgettable memory, while the others did it behind closed doors. But the interesting point is that though capital punishment has been done in many countries since ancient times, there are still no satisfactory evidence showing that it has a deterrent effect. In this paper, the ineffectiveness of it will be discussed by many different aspects. First, the history of it and where it is done will be described to give a general idea. Then, the thoughts of people and criminals’ family and what Human Rights Law tells about this will be explained. To provide these, information will be given on its expenses, other possibilities of wrong decisions and the non-deterrent effect evidences.

HISTORY OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

There are different assumptions about the origin of capital punishment. Some experts believe that capital punishment was done to please Gods while others claim that it is hatred and revenge coming from the uncivilized Mediterranean, Germanic and Nordic people. Another claim is that the first capital punishment was done in by the ruler Hammurabi, the founder of talionic principle (Franck, 2003) which requires the parallelism between the crime and punishment.

WHERE IS IT DONE?

If we look at today nothing seems to have changed much. Researches show us that from that time till now nothing has changed much. Despite all campaigns done against the capital punishment, Amnesty International revealed that at least 2.148 people were executed last year mostly in China (1,770), Iran (94), Saudi Arabia (86), the USA (60) and (31) respectively and more than 20.000 people are waiting for their date of death. (Irons, 2006, par.1)

WHAT DO PEOPLE THINK ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Aside from all these, the most surprising point is the change in the thoughts of people. A U.S. study of a group of randomly chosen people shows us that people knew very little about the effects of capital punishment and as they learned more about it, their thoughts changed too. Another point is that time has a role in this too. For example, in Germany many people were still supporting the capital punishment even after it was abolished but twenty years later hardly anyone seemed to oppose it. ( Franck, 2003). It is obvious that the attitudes of people are not a reliable source for learning the acceptance of a rule. So, people’s not opposing to capital punishment shouldn’t be shown as a reason by countries.

However, if we look at a poll recently declared, we will see that people seem to be more determined on their thoughts about the non-deterrent effect of death penalty. The poll done by the Center for Survey Research at Penn Sate Harrisburg, declared that out of 865 respondents 42.9 % preferred the death penalty while 45.1 % chose life with or without parole. The theoretical margin of error of the poll is 3.4 %. The other 12 % answered ‘don’t know/ not sure’ or didn’t answer. The spokesman for Pennsylvanians for Alternatives to Death Penalty said that this poll is a show of changing attitudes in the sate over a decade. (Morrison, 2007, par 4-6)

WHAT DO CRIMINALS’ FAMILIES FEEL ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Despite of the fact that there are not many researches done on the effects of execution have on the families of condemned, a few of them shows us that such families encounter with much challenges in their lives. While some attempt suicide, others either lose their jobs or feel isolated.(Gelineav, 2006) To give an example, Christina Lawson, whose husband David Martinez,was executed last year for the rape and murder of Kierza Paul, a 24-year-old Minnersota University student, said:” When somebody says ‘how did your husband die?’ and you say ‘Oh, he was executed by the state of Texas,’ their hand leaves you and they walk away as if you are contagious with this death penalty disease.” (Gelineav, 2006, par 3).

To give another example, a sociologist, Susan Sharp, said in her book, Hidden Victims, that she found family members who had been threatened, lost their jobs and had their tires slashed even one woman told her that her pets were killed by others accusing her relative’s crime. And one women , Reid(55), whose brother was executed in said though she had support from the others she still felt isolated.(Gelineav, 2006, par 6) .As we can see, death penalty not only affects the person, but also affects the whole community and leave the condemners’ families in a hard situation.

WHAT DO HUMAN RIGHTS TELL ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Furthermore, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which is a fundamental declaration for human rights and dignity, tells this about the liberty of life in article three: ‘ Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person ‘. This brief explanation is completely supports the liberty of human life. Moreover, no mention was done about the capital punishment let alone its being used. (Franck, 2003). Though is the founder of the Human Rights Declaration, it is among the countries which prefer the death penalty most. As a result, aside from what people think and do, there may not be an agreement between what countries do and what their laws tell about this.

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT COSTS TOO MUCH

By 1976, with Gregg and Georgia thirty five states made new laws about the capital punishment on the constitutional standards of sentencing phase. But from that day till now, all these changes failed and new procedures were tired to be enacted. But as Bennar says:” the constitutionalizing of capital punishment created an enormously complicated, expensive and time- consuming apparatus that had little affect on the outcome of cases. Being executed was still, as Justice steward had put it in Furman, like being struck by lightning; the only difference was now that it only took a decade and millions of dollars or public money for the lightning to strike. ( , 2006, par 15).

The only unlucky states are not them. Another report was done by New Jersey Policy Perspective, which says: , having the death penalty, spent $ 250 million in 1982, still thought not to be counted exactly which means the expenditure is higher than this. The only conclusion can be reached by this is that over the past twenty three years tax payers paid more than a quarter of a billion dollars on a capital punishment executing no one. ( Berman, 2007). These three states are among the hundred ones spending treasures on a non-working system. If we calculate the real costs, it would be better to use this money to hinder punishments rather than punishing condemners.

OTHER POSSIBILITIES OF WRONG DECISIONS

Taken into consideration, death penalty is found to be used unfairly against some racial minorities, the poor and mentally ill. So, agreeably it is a criminal system that no justice system can afford. (Irons, 2006)

As Ted Heath states the possibility of executing an innocent must be the strongest argument against the death penalty. The execution of Derenk Benkley in 1953 turned the tide of the abolition campaign in . Ted Heath, arguing in the Commons for abolition, said that the true test of a commitment to capital punishment was not a willingness to act as the executioner, but a preparedness to be executed by mistake. Since the death penalty was reintroduced in the in 1973, 122 people have been released from death row when evidence exonerating them came to light. Justice is always fallible; this is why an irrevocable penalty is unacceptable. (Irons, 2006, par. 5)

Other than these, there is also the possibility of executing mentally ill people. The American Civil Liberties Union reveals that more than 10 % out of 3,400 inmates mentally ill people who are waiting for their execution day .In 1997 The Dallas Morning News reported that 3/1 of 602 inmates nationwide responding the newspaper’s poll had been treated for various psychiatric problems.(Malone, 2005, par. 30)

As we can see from the examples, capital punishment doesn’t give the chance to change the verdict in case of a wrong decision in the court. Also, the possibility of executing an innocent and its being used against the poor and some radical minorities are enough to show its ineffectiveness and useless.

Death penalty again fails deterring because criminals don’t think of future while they kill or steal. A Japanese prison psychiatrist studied 145 men put into jail because of murder between the years 1955- 1957. Surprisingly, he found out that o one has thought of the death penalty when they did kill. In British Physician Roper found that most criminals were such in an aggressive situation during the act that they couldn’t think of anything or stop themselves while others could escape. (Franck, 2003)

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT HAS NO DETERRENT AFFECT

In 1959, Thorsten Sellin did a research showing the relation between the death penalty and crime rates in neighboring states within the U.S, some of which used the death penalty while the others didn’t. A comparison of , Massachussets and Connecticud showed that within 1920- 1963, the murder rate for every a hundred thousand people were as much high in as in the other two states where capital punishment had been abolished . Another comparison between , where the death penalty was introduced in 1935, Montano and , where the death penalty was abolished, showed that the crime rate was similar in three states. ( Franck, 2003)

In one of his recent studies he gave us these results: in one of the graphs he did comparing homicide rates among randomly chosen states, Texas, New York and California within the years 1982 to 2002, Texas executed two hundred and thirty nine prisoners, California ten a New York none. In spite of these, the homicide rates are quite alike in all three states. (Goertzel, 2004)

To add, there is no statistical evidence showing that death penalty has deterrence. After a moratorium, executions resumed in the in 1977. From that time till now, has a third and one- half of all executions in the Moreover, since the first execution in 1982, violent crime has increased by forty six per cent in which can be compared to an average rise of five percent for the rest of the country.

In United Nations group trying to prevent drug trafficking found that the death penalty had no effect on drug traffickers. On the contrary, since they had a chance of obtaining guilty verdict, courts had to need more solid proof to condemn them to death penalty. So, they pointed out that it was better to sentence them to have a deterrent effect.

If it deterred criminals than other punishments, analyses of comparative legal systems would show a lower crime rate for the nations who didn’t abolish it than the abolished ones.

The only known study indicating that capital punishment has deterrence was done in 1975 by Isaac Ehrlisch in the Within the time 1932- 1970, he found that while the executions were diminished, crime rates were increased which made him think that death penalty had a deterrent effect. However, he did not take into consideration the increased availability of guns and he forgot that the number of executions couldn’t affect the crime rate where the capital punishment were abolished or no longer used.

In 1975, the of Science sent a group to approve these results. However, it came out that his study didn’t present any useful prove on the deterrence of the death penalty. The report also stated that the most widely assumptions on the deterrent effect couldn’t be used making certain decisions. ( Franck, 2003)

A recent study done by The Times shows that for the last twenty years the homicide rate in states with the death penalty has been 48% to 101% higher than in states without the death penalty. The same study also showed that homicide rates sowed the approximately the same rates in the states between having capital punishment and the states which didn’t have it. (Bonner & Fessender, 2000)

Another recently done research supporting these findings points out that though has death penalty in its thirty eight states, crime rate and executions are showing the same rates. Even using injection, has the most crime rate itself.

Furthermore, criminologists searching the effects of death penalty on people found that crime just leads to crime. (Irons, 2006, par 6-7).

However, though people may not be seem to agree with this, in this point research results help us. For example, when Minnesota abolished capital punishment in 1911, 60 % of people were in favor of the capital punishment said, Susan Gardner, a career prosecutor in St. Paul and elected country attorney there since 1994. However, the research results didn’t say so said Ms. Gardner and added:” The public policy makers in think the death penalty is not efficient, it is not a deterrent, it is a devise form of punishment that we simply don’t need.” (Bonner & Fessender, 2000, par. 15)

CONCLUSION

As it is understood from the results of researches and studies, regardless of place, state and time capital punishment still can’t be proven to have a deterrent effect on crime rates. On the contrary, all researches show very openly that crime breeds violence for people. Moreover, capital punishment not only gives harms to the person but also to condemners’ families and to society. They feel isolated and helpless. Furthermore, there is a contradiction between what laws say and what countries do about capital punishment as well as what people think and do. Also regarding the attorneys’ and judges’ thoughts on capital punishment, giving a reason showing these just seems nonsense. Capital punishment is also against the Human Rights Declaration and if we consider the expenditures done on it, the possibilities of wrong decisions in the court and the possibility of condemning an innocent and mentally ill people, it is absolutely an unnecessary and ineffective thing to do. Having not been proven to have a deterrent affect statistically should be taken into consideration as well.

Rather than preferring the death penalty and trying to find proofs to continue doing this, all this time and money should be spent on learning whether life imprisonment can be a more effective punishment and why capital punishment is still preferred despite all these researches proving its ineffectiveness and why black people are condemned most.
My two cents (which isn't worth much.) Emotion: smile Hope this helps.

INTRODUCTION

Capital punishment-executing of criminals (redundant), has been done (wording) all over the world, regardless of age, sex and nationality in different ways (unclear as to what this modifies) (doesn't add info.) such as by using guillotine, hanging, injection, gases or electro shock. The only aim of (xx) was (why was?) to hinder similar crimes, (another punctuation) even some countries perform these executions in public to teach their people a lesson and to make an unforgettable memory, while the others did it behind closed doors. But the interesting point is that though capital punishment has been done in many countries since ancient times, there are still no satisfactory evidence showing that it has a deterrent effect (clarify. Deter what?). In this paper, the ineffectiveness of it (clarify) will be discussed by many different aspects. First, the history of it (awk.) and where it is done will be described to give a general idea (redundant). Then, the thoughts of people and criminals’ family and what Human Rights Law tells about this will be explained (rephrase). To provide these, information will be given on its expenses, other possibilities of wrong decisions and the non-deterrent effect evidences. (too many sentences in passive voices)
Bolded a few things that may need fixing.

HISTORY OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

There are different assumptions (not assumptions) about the origin of capital punishment. Some experts believe that capital punishment was done to please Gods while others claim that it is hatred and revenge coming from the uncivilized (judgemental) Mediterranean, Germanic and Nordic people. Another claim is that the first capital punishment was done in by the ruler Hammurabi, the founder of talionic principle (Franck, 2003) which requires the parallelism between the crime and punishment.

WHERE IS IT DONE?

If we look at today nothing seems to have changed much. Researches show us that from that time till now nothing has changed much (already said). Despite all campaigns done against the capital punishment, Amnesty International revealed that at least 2.148 people were executed last year, mostly in China (1,770), Iran (94), Saudi Arabia (86), the USA (60) and (31) respectively and more than 20.000 people are waiting for their date of death. (Irons, 2006, par.1)

WHAT DO PEOPLE THINK ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

I'm not sure how this relates to your thesis. I'd compare crime statistics between countries that perform no capital punishment with countries that perform them
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From what I've read so far, you've covered a lot of ground--perhaps a little too much. Capital punishment is a broad topic, and as a reader, I'd like to see more elaborations on various points you've raised and how they support your thesis (if at all).
Thanks for your help Julielai .I have just finished it today so my mind is blurred a bit. I will check its content again a few days later.
Hi,

I have edited the text.

INTRODUCTION

Capital punishment

Criminals have been executed all over the world, regardless of age, sex and nationality in different ways such as by using guillotine, hanging, injection, gases or electric shock. The only aim was to prevent or reduce crimes. Some countries preferred to publicly show execution so as to teach a lesson to people and make an unforgettable impression, while others did it behind closed doors. But the interesting point is, that though capital punishment has been implemented in many countries since ancient times, there are still no satisfactory evidence to show that it has a deterrent effect. In this paper, the ineffectiveness of it will be discussed in different ways. First, the history of capital punishment and where it is practised will be described so as to give a general idea. Then, the views of people and criminals’ family and what Human Rights Law tells about this will be explained. To provide these, information will be provided on its expenses, possibilities of wrong decisions and the evidences of non-deterrent effect.

HISTORY OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

There are different assumptions about the origin of capital punishment. Some experts believe that capital punishment was done to please Gods while others claim that it is hatred and revenge coming from the uncivilized Mediterranean, Germanic and Nordic people. Another claim is that capital punishment was first done in Babylon by the ruler Hammurabi, the founder of talionic principle (Franck, 2003) which requires parallelism between the crime and punishment.

WHERE IS IT DONE?

If we look today, nothing seems to have changed much. Researches show us that from that time till now, nothing has changed much. Despite all campaigns against capital punishment, Amnesty International revealed that at least 2,148 people were executed last year, mostly in China (1,770), Iran (94), Saudi Arabia (86), USA (60) and Pakistan (31), respectively and more than 20,000 people are waiting for their date of death. (Irons, 2006, par.1)

WHAT DO PEOPLE THINK ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Aside from all these, the most surprising point is the change in the thoughts of people. A U.S. study of a group of randomly chosen people shows that people knew very little about the effects of capital punishment and as they learned more about it, their thoughts changed too. Another point is that time has a role in this too. For example, in Germany, many people still supported capital punishment, even after it was abolished. But twenty years later hardly anyone seems to oppose it. ( Franck, 2003). It is obvious that the attitude of people is not a reliable source for learning the acceptance of a rule. So, people not opposing capital punishment shouldn’t be shown as a reason by countries.

However, if we look at a poll recently declared, we will see that people seem to be more determined in their views about the non-deterrent effect of death penalty. The poll done by the Center for Survey Research at Penn Sate Harrisburg, declared that out of 865 respondents, 42.9 % preferred the death penalty, while 45.1 % chose life with or without parole. The theoretical margin of error of the poll is 3.4 %. The other 12 % answered ‘don’t know/ not sure’ or didn’t answer. The spokesman for Pennsylvanians for Alternatives to Death Penalty said that this poll shows the changing attitude in the state over a decade. (Morrison, 2007, par 4-6)

WHAT DO FAMILIES OF CRIMINALS FEEL ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Despite the fact that very few research was done on the effects of execution on the families of condemned, a few showed that such families encounter much challenges in their lives. While some attempted suicide, others either lost their jobs or felt isolated.(Gelineav, 2006) To give an example, Christina Lawson, whose husband David Martinez,was executed last year for the rape and murder of Kierza Paul, a 24-year-old Minnersota University student, said:” When somebody asks ‘How did your husband die?’ and you say ‘Oh, he was executed by the state of Texas,’ their hand leaves you and they walk away as if you are contaminated with this death penalty disease.” (Gelineav, 2006, par 3).

To give another example, a sociologist, Susan Sharp, said in her book, Hidden Victims, that she found family members, who had been threatened, lost their jobs and had their tires of their vehicles slashed. Even one woman told her that her pets were killed by others accusing her of her relative’s crime. And one women , Reid(55), whose brother was executed in Virginia, said that though she had support from others, she still felt isolated.(Gelineav, 2006, par 6) .As we can observe, the death penalty not only affects the guilty person, but also affects the whole community and places the families of the condemned in a hard situation.

WHAT DO HUMAN RIGHTS SAY ABOUT CAPITAL PUNISHMENT?

Furthermore, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which is a fundamental declaration for human rights and dignity, tells about the liberty of life in Article Three: ‘ Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person ‘. This brief explanation completely supports the liberty of human life. Moreover, no mention was made about capital punishment, let alone about it being used. (Franck, 2003). Though America is the founder of the Human Rights Declaration, it is also among the countries, which prefer the death penalty most. As a result, aside from what people think and do, there may not be an agreement between what countries do and what their laws state about this.

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT COSTS TOO MUCH

By 1976, along with Gregg (?)and Georgia, thirty-five states made new laws about capital punishment on the constitutional standards of sentencing phase. But from that day till now, all these changes failed and new procedures had to be enacted. But as Bennar says,” The constitutionalizing of capital punishment created an enormously complicated, expensive and time-consuming apparatus that had little effect on the outcome of cases. Being executed was, still, as Justice Steward put it in Furman, like being struck by lightning; the only difference being that now it took a decade and millions of dollars of public money, for the lightning to strike. ( Garland, 2006, par 15).

The only unlucky states are those that do not have capital punishment . Another report done by New Jersey Policy Perspective says: New Jersey, having the death penalty, spent $ 250 million in 1982. But still it is not counted exactly, which means the expenditure was more than this. The only conclusion that can be reached by this, is that over the past twenty-three years, tax payers paid more than a quarter of a billion dollars on capital punishment executing no one. ( Berman, 2007). These three states are among the hundred states, spending money on a non-working system. If we calculate the real costs, it would be better to use this money to prevent crime, rather than punishing condemners.

OTHER POSSIBILITIES OF WRONG DECISIONS

Taken into consideration all aspects, death penalty is found to be used unfairly against racial minorities, poor and mentally ill. So, agreeably it is a criminal system that no Justice system can afford. (Irons, 2006)

As Ted Heath states, the possibility of executing an innocent must be the strongest argument against the death penalty. The execution of Derenk Benkley in 1953 turned the tide of the abolition campaign in Britain. Ted Heath, arguing in the Commons for abolition, said that the true test of a commitment to capital punishment, was not a willingness to act as the executioner, but a preparedness to be executed by mistake. Since the death penalty was reintroduced in the USA in 1973, 122 people have been released from death row, when evidence exonerating them came to light. Justice is always fallible; this is why an irrevocable penalty is unacceptable. (Irons, 2006, par. 5)

Other than these, there is also the possibility of executing mentally ill people. The American Civil Liberties Union reveals that more than 10 % out of 3,400 mentally ill people are waiting for their execution day .In 1997, The Dallas Morning News reported that 3/1(?) of 602 inmates nationwide responding to the newspaper’s poll had been treated for various psychiatric problems.(Malone, 2005, par. 30)

As we can see from the examples, capital punishment doesn’t give a chance to change the verdict, in case of a wrong decision by the court. Also, the possibility of executing an innocent and it being used against the poor and radical minorities are enough to show its ineffectiveness.

Death penalty again fails in deterring, because criminals don’t think of the future while killing or stealing. A Japanese prison psychiatrist studied 145 men put into jail because of murder between the years 1955- 1957. Surprisingly, he found out that no one thought of the death penalty when they killed. In 1969, a British Physician, Roper found that most criminals were in such an aggressive mood during the act, that they couldn’t think of anything or stop themselves while others escaped. (Franck, 2003)

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT HAS NO DETERRENT AFFECT

In 1959, Thorsten Sellin did a research showing the relation between the death penalty and crime rates in neighboring states within the U.S, some of which used the death penalty while others didn’t. A comparison of Rhode Island, Massachussets and Connecticud showed that within 1920- 1963, the murder rate for every hundred thousand people were as much high in Rhode Island as in the other two states, where capital punishment had been abolished . Another comparison between Kansas, where the death penalty was introduced in 1935, and Montano and Colorado, where the death penalty was abolished, showed that the crime rate was similar in three states. ( Franck, 2003)

In one of his recent studies, he gave us these results: in one of the graphs he compared homicide rates among randomly chosen states, Texas, New York and California. Between the years 1982 to 2002, Texas executed two hundred and thirty nine prisoners, California, ten and New York, none. In spite of these, the homicide rates were almost the same in all three states. (Goertzel, 2004)

To add, there is no statistical evidence showing that death penalty has a deterrence. After a moratorium, executions resumed in the U.S. in 1977. From that time till now, Texas has a third and one- half of all executions in the U.S. Moreover, since the first execution in 1982, violent crime has increased by forty six per cent in Texas, which can be compared to an average rise of five percent for the rest of the country.

In 1985, a United Nations group trying to prevent drug trafficking found that the death penalty had no effect on drug traffickers. On the contrary, since they had a chance of obtaining guilty verdict, courts needed more solid proof to condemn them to death penalty. So, they pointed out that it was better to sentence them to so as to have a deterrent effect.

If it deterred criminals than other punishment, analyses of comparative legal systems would show a lower crime rate for the nations who didn’t abolish it, than the abolished ones.

The only known study indicating that capital punishment has deterrence was done in 1975 by Isaac Ehrlisch in the U.S. Between 1932- 1970, he found that while executions diminished, crime rates increased, which made him think that death penalty had a deterrent effect. However, he did not take into consideration, the increased availability of guns and he forgot that the number of executions couldn’t affect the crime rate when capital punishment was abolished or no longer used.

In 1975, the U.S Academy of Science sent a group to approve these results. However, it came out that his study didn’t present any useful proof on the deterrence of the death penalty. The report also stated that the most widely assumptions on the deterrent effect couldn’t be used for making certain decisions. ( Franck, 2003)

A recent study done by The Times, showed that for the last twenty years, the homicide rate in states with the death penalty has been 48% to 101% higher than in states without the death penalty. The same study also showed that homicide rates were approximately the same in the states having capital punishment and states which didn’t have it. (Bonner & Fessender, 2000)

Another recent research supporting these findings points out that though America has death penalty in thirty-eight states, crime rate and executions are showing the same rates. Even Texas using injection, has the most crime rate.

Furthermore, criminologists researching the effects of death penalty on people found that crime just leads to crime. (Irons, 2006, par 6-7).

However, though people may not seem to agree with this point, research results help us. For example, when Minnesota abolished capital punishment in 1911, 60 % of people were in favour of capital punishment, said Susan Gardner, a career prosecutor in St. Paul and elected country attorney there since 1994. However, the research results didn’t say so, said Ms. Gardner and added:” The public policy makers in Minnesota think the death penalty is not efficient; it is not a deterrent, it is a devise form of punishment that we simply don’t need.” (Bonner & Fessender, 2000, par. 15)

CONCLUSION

As is understood from the results of researches and studies, regardless of place, state and time, capital punishment still can’t be proven to have a deterrent effect on crime rates. On the contrary, all research shows very openly that crime breeds violence for people. Moreover, capital punishment not only cause harm to the person, but also to the families of the condemned and to society. They feel isolated and helpless. Furthermore, there is a contradiction between what laws say and what countries do about capital punishment as well as what people think and do. Also, regarding the attorneys' and judges’ thoughts on capital punishment, giving a reason showing these just seems nonsense. Capital punishment is also against the Human Rights Declaration and if we consider the expenditures on it, the possibilities of wrong decisions in the court and the possibility of condemning an innocent and mentally ill person, it is absolutely an unnecessary and ineffective thing to do. Not having proven to be a deterrent statistically, should be taken into consideration as well.

Rather than preferring the death penalty and trying to find proof to continue doing this, all this time and money should be spent on learning whether life imprisonment can be a more effective punishment and why capital punishment is still preferred, despite all research proving its ineffectiveness and why black people are condemned the most.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you Newmoon, I corrected my mistakes.
By the way , my dear teacher Ufuk, this homework is mine. If you see this work by chance in the forum please don't misunderstand. Emotion: smile I didn't steal it from someone.