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According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "resemble" is a transitive verb and cannot used in progressive or passive form.

Is the following sentence wrong?
"John is gradually resembling his father."

Should I say, "John is gradually becoming more like his father" instead?
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SnappyIs the following sentence wrong?
"John is gradually resembling his father."
Not really wrong. A bit strange maybe. The fact is that even the so-called "non-progressive" verbs will be seen in a progressive tense from time to time, especially when a change is indicated. In this case the resemblance of John to his father is changing. So you'll occasionally see the progressive with expressions like "more and more", even with non-progressive verbs.

It's looking more and more like it's going to rain.
As I read that novel, I find that I'm liking it less and less.
The mixture smelling sweeter and sweeter as it warms up.

CJ
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[/quote]Not really wrong. A bit strange maybe. The fact is that even the so-called "non-progressive" verbs will be seen in a progressive tense from time to time, especially when a change is indicated. In this case the resemblance of John to his father is changing. So you'll occasionally see the progressive with expressions like "more and more", even with non-progressive verbs.

[/quote]

Do you mean the following sentence is correct?

"He is resembling his father more and more as the years go by."
SnappyDo you mean the following sentence is correct?

"He is resembling his father more and more as the years go by."
Yes. I mean that it is correct. At least I wouldn't have any objections to it. The same sentence with the simple tense is also fine, of course: He resembles his father more and ....

CJ