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Hello,

1. If a cashier in a shop greets you 'Are you all right?' instead of the usual 'hi' or 'hello', do native speakers actually reply with 'yes' and ask back 'and yourself?'?

2. If not, what is the usual and polite response to this kind of greeting?

I usually hear this greeting in the UK, although I'm not sure if it's the same in the US.

Thank you so much for your thoughts on this.
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I normally say, "Fine thanks, yourself?" That would tend to be somebody I know and they know me although only from the shop. If I wanted to be more formal then I would add I'm before fine and how are you instead of yourself. Of course intonation plays a big part here.

I would only reply yes, if the speaker wasn't sure if I was alright, and I wanted to ensure them that I was, rather than as a greeting. Yes would come over as rude.
Thank you, Dave, for your helpful response.
Dave PhillipsThat would tend to be somebody I know and they know me although only from the shop.
What if you were a complete stranger to them and they to you? Is it okay to return him the question 'yourself?'? I wonder if they might think you feel you're close friends when in fact you're not.
Dave PhillipsYes would come over as rude.
If I understood you correctly, if it was a greeting, then simply 'yes' would be rude. Kindly confirm.
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"Are you all right?" as a greeting seems very strange to me. If a salesclerk in a store said it to me, I would assume they were asking if I needed help in finding something. I would probably say, "I'm fine, thanks," but it would not occur to me to say "and you?" as I would if they said "how are you?"
I think, "And you?" would be rude.

It seems like a natural, low key way to ask if you would like assistance.

"I'm fine," or "We're doing okay" is the natural response when you mean to indicate that you don't wish to be assisted at that time.

Business is really slow right now. People are "just looking," and sales people are searching for something to say.

"I'm fine. How are you?" would be like saing, "Mind your own business."
Thanks, khoff and Avangi, for your responses. I really appreciate them.

Personally, I find "Are you all right?" strange as a greeting because my exposure is in American English, but in the UK, I hear people say this as a greeting, eg. someone sees his friend by chance in a train, or a cashier greets you "Are you all right?" before he scans your items.

I asked because I don't want to sound rude (if I didn't reply with "and you?"), or to appear funny or suggest "Mind your own business" like what Avangi said (if I replied with "and you?") to a cashier I don't know because British customers don't normally ask the same question back. I'm not sure about this, though, I'm just guessing. Please advise.

Also, if a cashier greets me with "Are you all right?", I don't think he is asking if I need assistance.
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Anonymous Also, if a cashier greets me with "Are you all right?", I don't think he is asking if I need assistance.
When cashing out is your first encounter with the cashier, they usually want to know if you've found everything you were looking for. I suspect they've been trained that way in order to possibly squeeze a couple more purchases out of you.
Sometimes they struggle for a new way to ask the old question.
Anyway, if a cashier asks me if I'm alright, that's the way I take it - unless I've given him some reason to suspect I'm in some sort of stress. Emotion: big smile
AvangiWhen cashing out is your first encounter with the cashier, they usually want to know if you've found everything you were looking for.
That makes sense. Thanks, Avangi, for your explanation. However, I've also encountered a cashier in a Starbucks in the UK greeting me with 'Are you all right?' before getting my order. The "if I've found everything I was looking for" idea doesn't seem to apply here. Also,I don't think I appeared to be in some sort of stress at that time. What do you think of this scenario?
AvangiSometimes they struggle for a new way to ask the old question.
I'm just curious, what was the old question? Emotion: thinking
"Did you find everything you were looking for?"

Oh, you mean, when they ask before you start looking.

I see your point. Maybe the Starbucks person is hoping you're a talent scout.

(I need to slow down.)
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