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Hi everybody,

How can you enquire about possible price reductions in a polite way in a restaurant? You are a tourist. Let's suppose that you know nothing about your possibilities. So you do NOT ask about something special (accepted vouchers, special price reduction for tourists or larger groups, etc.). You would like to ask it in general (and maybe you get a brief summary about the possible price reductions).

Thanks for your answer in advance.
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In western Europe and in the US, I have never heard of bargaining for your dinner at a restaurant. And (particularly in the US) they automatically add in a 15% gratuity.

There are some places where bargaining is traditional (like for cars or at flea markets), but in a restaurant it is de regueur about not bickering over the menu prices. If you don't like the price of theburger at 60 Degrees (where there is a $200 hamburger on the menu), just leave and go next door to Burger King or down the street to Bernie's Burger Bus.

I said the same to somebody asking it in a forum (Hungarian one). I've never heard of this 'gratuity'. I learned something again. As I can see it is the same as 'tip' in the case of a restaurant.

It is also NOT traditional in Hungarian restaurants that you try bargaining. But people ask about accepted vouchers, for example. I guess that is not considered bargaining. Is there a polite way to enquire about such things like accepted vouchers (but not about just them but about everything that do NOT fit the concept of bargaining) IN GENERAL?

$200 hamburger Emotion: smile That is something O_o It seems extremely brutal if I change it to Hungarian Forint. Maybe it is not so extreme there. I don't know much about these things.

Thanks for your answer in advance.
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Hole One a New SeeIs there a polite way to enquire about such things like accepted vouchers
"Do you take/accept Luncheon Vouchers*?"

*Or whatever the locally used term is.
Thanks for the answer Emotion: smile

What is the solution if you want to generalize it? Let's suppose that there are other things that lead to reduced cost (for example they give price reduction for groups. That is still not bargaining). How could you ask about all these possibilities together? For me, 'together' doesn't mean that you mention all the possibilities that cross your mind in one sentence. We suppose that you don't know the possible possibilities (not even its way). Maybe this sentence could use the word 'deal' but I'm not sure.

Thanks for your answer in advance.
Hole One a New See$200 hamburger That is something O_o It seems extremely brutal if I change it to Hungarian Forint. Maybe it is not so extreme there.
It is very expensive, especially when the gratuity is added! (If you follow the link, you will see their menu.)
Hole One a New SeeI've never heard of this 'gratuity'. I learned something again. As I can see it is the same as 'tip' in the case of a restaurant.
A gratuity is different from a tip. A tip is what patrons leave for good service. It is expected, but optional. If you get really bad service, or the waitstaff is really rude, you don't have to leave a tip.
A gratuity is added by the establishment, especially for large groups, to compensate for the fact that they don't pay their waitstaff a living wage. Patrons can leave a tip in addition to the gratuity, if the service is exceptionally good.
Hole One a New SeeBut people ask about accepted vouchers, for example.
If I have a coupon or voucher, I just hand it to the waiter with my payment when I pay the bill. I don't ask anything beforehand, unless there is a requirement (on the voucher) to do so.
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Restaurants do not generally give any form of price-reductions/offers other than those they announce, often by a notice in the window, for example, "Senior Citizens 10% Reduction Tuesday - Thursday'" or "Two meals for the price of one11.30-13.00". Travel companies may be able to arrange special prices for groups, but this will be negotiated with the owner/manager. As AS said, we do not normally discuss discounts/offers//reductions when we go into a restaurant in most European countries or the USA. We expect to pay the price stated on the menu.

On holiday In Greece and Turkey, I have occasionally bargained, but only when a person standing outside the establishment has tried to get me to enter the establishment and clearly indicated that s/he is prepared to negotiate. Then the conversation has gone something like this:

A: Hello sir, we have special offer today. Our roast lamb speciality is only 15 euros today.
B: No thanks, that is too much for me.
A: Because your wife is so beautiful, I give you two meals for only 25 Euros.
B: Sorry, but I never pay more than 20 euros for our dinner.
A, But this is the finest lamb in the city, I cannot charge less than 24, or my children will be forced to be on the streets.
B: How about 22?
A; 23, and I give you a free olive each.
B. Ok, but we'll have two olives, please.
Thank you, AlpheccaStars Emotion: smile

It is good to know these things, very clear explanation Emotion: smile

Generally speaking, the content of the last paragraph goes in the same way in Hungary. And somebody just voted me down because I wrote something similar on a Hungarian forum Emotion: big smile
Thank you, fivejedjon Emotion: smile

Interesting and funny story Emotion: smile
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