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Will you restrain youself?

Will you keep a low profile?

Will you lower your sail?

Hi,

Do all of the above make sense and mean about the same? Thanks.
Comments  
They don't mean the same thing to me.

Will you restrain youself? Hold yourself back from attacking verbally or physically. Contain your anger.

Will you keep a low profile? Try to blend in and not make yourself obvious. / Stay away from places where you normally go so you won't be seen.

Will you lower your sail? (??? I'm not familiar with this expression. )

CJ
Thanks, Calijim.

I tried to find an expression in English. Our counterpart is the combination of the first and second in my first post.

Here is more information about our version:1. Elders often says it to younger people in our culture, asking them not to show off too much or to get a hold of themselves.

2. Suprevisors sometimes use it to their subordinates, demanding them not to outshine or outsmart their supervisors.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks, Calijim.

I tried to find an expression in English. Our counterpart is the combination of the first and second in my first post.

Here is more information about our version:1. Elders often says it to younger people in our culture, asking them not to show off too much or to get a hold of themselves.

2. Suprevisors sometimes use it to their subordinates, demanding them not to outshine or outsmart their supervisors.
Thanks, Calijim.

I tried to find an expression in English. Our counterpart is the combination of the first and second in my first post.

Here is more information about our version:1. Elders often says it to younger people in our culture, asking them not to show off too much or to get a hold of themselves.

2. Suprevisors sometimes use it to their subordinates, demanding them not to outshine or outsmart their supervisors.
Thanks, Calijim.

I tried to find an expression in English. Our counterpart is the combination of the first and second in my first post.

Here is more information about our version:1. Elders often says it to younger people in our culture, asking them not to show off too much or to get a hold of themselves.

2. Suprevisors sometimes use it to their subordinates, demanding them not to outshine or outsmart their supervisors.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thanks, Calijim.

I tried to find an expression in English. Our counterpart is the combination of the first and second in my first post.

Here is more information about our version:1. Elders often says it to younger people in our culture, asking them not to show off too much or to get a hold of themselves.

2. Suprevisors sometimes use it to their subordinates, demanding them not to outshine or outsmart their supervisors.
Thanks, CJ.

When I ran across "please be more discreet" you replied to another thread of mine, I recognized it was really close to our counterpart. What do you think?