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I was looking through a pamphlet recently when I found this phrase...

'Riding the airplane and taking the train are both ways to travel, but they have differences'

I thought 'ride' was only used to describe moving on a horse or bicycle....is it possible to use it for airplanes?

If so, then how about cars and trains?
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We can definitely ride the train. We sometimes go for a ride in a car, but I'm not sure I would ever say "I rode my car", unless I were surfing on top of it. Riding an airplane sounds kind of strange to me; I would say take or travel by.
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I'd say I'm riding my plane only if I were the pilot (and of a small one to boot), but it seems to be a wider usage than that:

THE LIMITS OF RISK; From Apples to Terrorism, Governments Try to ...

''People face risks all the time, whether they're riding a plane or eating a grape,'' he said. ''These incidents simply remind us of our vulnerabilities. ...
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Comments  
JKBelieveI was looking through a pamphlet recently when I found this phrase...

'Riding the airplane and taking the train are both ways to travel, but they have differences'

I thought 'ride' was only used to describe moving on a horse or bicycle....is it possible to use it for airplanes?

If so, then how about cars and trains?
For no logical reason, we simply don't use "ride" with planes.
 Marius Hancu's reply was promoted to an answer.
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