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1] You can ring the changes on the existing course material.

The above is on a school's language course.

Now they have made some changes. I saw it in the prospectus.

So I could write the following.

2] You have rang the changes on the existing course material.

Is the second sentence fine? I know the words 'ring the changes on something' .

Would it be correct to say 'have rang the changes'?
You might not write the present perfect tense with the words 'ring the changes' on something.

Your thoughts, please.
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You can say "I have RUNG the changes on the course material". Ring inflects like RING - RANG - RUNG.

"Ring the change on something" means "repeat the words or statements in the thing with some variations. But "ring the changes" could mean also "put a bad in place of a good".

paco
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Not to be confused with WRING - WRUNG - WRUNG, of course. Emotion: smile
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Comments  
To my knowledge there is no such verb as "have rang". e.g.

Q. HAVE you RUNG the bell?
A. No, I was occupied with something else, so I HAD it RUNG by my assistant.
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